Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

good terms with all its neighbors. She practiced with scrupulous loyalty to each of them the duties imposed by this neutrality.

"How was she recompensed by Germany for the confidence she showed in her? If there is a country that has the right to say it took up arms to defend its existence, it assuredly is Belgium. She desires passionately that an end be brought to the unheard sufferings of its population, but she would have kept only a peace that would assure her at the same time the equitable reparation and security and guarantees for the future."

The integrity of Belgium, the territory of the mother country and colonies, political, economic, and military independence without condition or restriction, reparation for damage suffered, and guarantees against a renewal of the aggression of 1914--such remain the indispensable conditions of a just peace so far as concerns Belgium. Any settlement that would not recognize them would shake the very foundations of justice, since it would forevermore be established that in international domains the violation of right creates a claim for its author and may become a source of profit.

Since the Royal Government a year ago formulated its conditions, it permits itself to recall that the Reichstag voted resolutions called peace resolutions. Chancellors and Ministers of Foreign Affairs have followed each other in the German Empire, and more recently in the Central Empires, and have published notes replying to the message of his Holiness, but never a word has been pronounced and never a line written clearly recognizing the indisputable rights of Belgium, that his Holiness has not ceased to recognize and proclaim.


STATEMENT OF BRITISH WAR AIMS BY PRIME MINISTER LLOYD-GEORGE1
January 5, 1918

When the Government invite organized labor in this country to assist them to maintain the might of their armies in the field, its representatives are entitled to ask that any misgivings and doubts which any of them may have about the purpose to which this precious strength is to be applied should be definitely cleared, and what is true

____________________
1

Text in The Times, London, January 7, 1918, p. 7.

-225-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 518

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.