Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

Finally in his idea of a league of peoples (Article 14) the President would very probably meet with no opposition in the monarchy.

We are therefore in agreement in the main. Our views are identical, not only in the broad principles regarding the new organization of the world after the war, but also in several concrete questions, and the differences which still exist do not appear to me to be so great that a conversation regarding them would not lead to enlightenment and a rapprochement. This situation which doubtless arises from the fact that Austria-Hungary on the one side and the United States on the other are composed of States whose interests are least at variance with one another tempts one to ask if an exchange of ideas could not be the point of departure for a personal conversation between all the States which have not yet joined in the peace negotiations.

. . . . . . . . . . .

Let Herr Wilson employ the great influence which he doubtless possesses over all his allies so that they shall for their part state the conditions upon which they are ready to talk. If he does so he will have rendered the inestimable service of setting general peace negotiations in motion.


THE ORIGIN OF THE SEPARATE PEACE AT BREST-LITOVSK ACCORDING TO FOREIGN MINISTER VON KÜHLMANN1
January 25, 1918

I wish to refer to the fable that the German negotiators left for Brest-Litovsk suddenly and there concocted a policy on the spot according to the requirements of the position. These statements lack all foundation. When I took office in July last year our policy in the East was already fixed. The activities of Brest-Litovsk must be considered as having two clearly divided stages. Russia had in her wireless message only proposed a general peace. At first therefore the negotiations with Russia could not be extended beyond the limits of a general peace. The negotiations on a general peace corresponded to the much discussed note of December 25. Anyone who asks why

____________________
1
Text in The Times, London, January 28, 1918, p. 5.

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