Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

GERMAN AND AUSTRIAN OFFICIAL REPORTS OF THE PEACE WITH UKRAINA1
February 9, 1918

German Report

Peace was signed with the Ukraine at 2 a. m. today.


Austrian Report

Today, at Brest-Litovsk, at 2 a. m. peace was signed with the Ukrainian Republic.2


RUSSIAN PROCLAMATION OF THE END OF THE WAR AND OF DEMOBILIZATION3
February 10-11, 1918

COMRADES: The peace negotiations are at an end. German capitalists, bankers, and landlords, supported by the silent cooperation of the English and French bourgeoisie, submitted to our comrades, the members of the peace delegation at Brest-Litovsk, conditions such as could not be subscribed to by the Russian Revolution.

The Governments of Germany and Austria desire to possess countries and peoples vanquished by the force of arms. To this the authority of the Russian peoples of workmen and peasants could not give its acquiescence. We could not sign a peace which would bring with it sadness, oppression, and suffering to millions of workmen and peasants. But we also can not, will not, and must not continue a war which was begun by Czars and capitalists in alliance with Czars and capitalists. We will not, and we must not, continue to be at war with Germans and Austrians--workmen and peasants like ourselves.

____________________
1
Texts in The Times, London, February 11, 1918, p. 7.
2
The German delegates at Brest-Litovsk succeeded in obtaining separate discussions with the representatives of the Ukraine; the result is recorded above. The representatives the Ukraine had only been included in the Russian Delegation since January 30; see The New York Times, February 1, 1918, p. 2.
3
Texts in The Times, London, February 13, 1918, p. 6.

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