Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

STATEMENT OF PRIME MINISTER LENINE AND FOREIGN MINISTER TROTSKY ON THE GERMAN INFRACTION OF THE ARMISTICE AND THEIR READINESS TO SIGN A PEACE TREATY1
February 19, 1918

TO THE GOVERNMENT OF THE GERMAN EMPIRE, BERLIN:

The Council of the People's Commissaries protest against the fact that the German Government has directed its troops against the Russian Council's Republic, which has declared the war as at an end, and which is demobilizing its army on all fronts.

The Workmen's and Peasants' Government of Russia could not anticipate such a step, because neither directly nor indirectly, has any one of the parties which concluded the armistice given the seven days' notice required in accordance with the treaty of December 15, for terminating it.

The Council of the People's Commissaries in the present circumstances regards itself as forced to formally declare its willingness to sign a peace upon the conditions which have been dictated by the Delegations of the Quadruple Alliance at Brest-Litovsk.

The Council of the People's Commissaries further declares that a detailed reply will be given without delay to the conditions of peace as proposed by the German Government.


RUSSIAN ACCEPTANCE OF GERMAN PEACE TERMS2
February 24, 1918

TO THE GERMAN GOVERNMENT, BERLIN: Our Parlementaires left Petrograd today, February 24, at noon, in the direction of Dvinsk, for the purpose of to the German Government, through the

____________________
1
Text in The Times, London, February 20, 1918, p. 6.
2

The German Government, not appreciating the value of the Russian proclamation of February 10, recommenced military operations at the expiry of the truce at noon on February 19. The result was to destroy the Russian faction of that date and compel them to accept the only possible horn of the dilemma presented to them at Brest-Litovsk, not without neutral reservations as to the permanence of the treaty they were now "ready to sign."

3

Texts in The Times, London, February 25, 1918, p. 9.

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