Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

DENIAL OF EMPEROR CHARLES IN A TELEGRAM TO KAISER WILLIAM II1
April 11, 1918

The French Prime Minister, driven into a corner, is endeavoring to escape from the net of lies in which he has entangled himself by piling up more and more untruths, and he does not hesitate now to make the completely false statement that I recognized that France had a just claim to the reacquisition of Alsace-Lorraine. I disavow this assertion with indignation. At a moment when Austro-Hungarian cannon are thundering jointly with German cannon on the Western front it hardly needs proof that I am fighting for these provinces, and am ready to continue fighting exactly as if it were a question of defending my own lands.

Although in the face of this eloquent proof of full community of aims, for which now for almost four years we have been waging war, I consider it to be superfluous to waste even a word on M. Clemenceau's false assertion, I desire, nevertheless, to take this opportunity of again assuring you of the complete solidarity which exists between you and me and your empire and mine. No intrigues, no attempts from whomsoever they may proceed, will imperil our loyal comradeship of arms, and we shall jointly enforce an honorable peace.


TELEGRAM OF KAISER WILLIAM II CONFIRMING HIS FAITH IN EMPEROR CHARLES2
April 12, 1918

Accept my heartiest thanks for your telegram, in which you repudiate as entirely baseless the assertion of the French Premier regarding your attitude toward French claims to Alsace-Lorraine, and in which you once again accentuate the solidarity of interest existing between us and our respective empires. I hasten to inform you that in my eyes there was no need whatever for any such assurance on your

____________________
ü

Text in The Times, London, April 12, 1918, p. 5.

ü

Text in The New York Times Current History magazine, June, 1918, p. 495.

-320-

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