Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

defensive character. The new treaty must not only cover the political relationship of the two Powers, but must also lead to the adaptation to altered conditions and to the insight gained of their manifold economic, military, and other relations, which were in future to be drawn closer.

The negotiations which were proceeding between the allied Governments were governed by a most careful regard, both in form and substance, to the sovereignty, the complete equality, and the independence of the contracting Powers. Henceforward, too, the alliance would not mean a threat or unfriendliness towards anyone. Nothing would be included in it which was calculated to necessitate or to offer a stimulus to the formation of counter-groupings. Everything which in future could be realized of the sublime idea of a universal League of Nations would find in the alliance no obstacle, but a favorable nucleus and a prepared group which could easily and naturally unite with every general combination of States resting on cognate principles.


STATEMENT OF THE CZECHO-SLOVAK NATIONAL COUNCIL AT WASHINGTON ON THE AIMS OF THE CZECHO-SLOVAKS IN RUSSIA1
July 27, 1918

There have been so many promising campaigns started in Russia during the last year of which nothing more is heard that the people in this country watch with a certain lack of confidence the successes of the Czecho-Slovak forces in Siberia and Eastern European Russia.

Will they be permanent or will they come to nothing, as did the ill-fated campaigns of Korniloff, the Don Cossacks, the various Siberian governments and many others? Can the Czecho-Slovaks stand their ground, a hundred thousand men among a hundred million, and are they not themselves talking about withdrawing from Russia?

It is, of course, well known that the Czecho-Slovaks are not Russians. The Czecho-Slovak army in Russia was created in order to fight the Germans and the Austrians, and when Russia deserted the cause of the Allies arrangements were made by Professor T. G.

____________________
1
Current History, September, 1918, p. 468.

-357-

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