Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

alone. That is something which must be decided by the Allies. The Czecho-Slovak army is one of the Allied armies, and it is as much under the order of the Versailles War Council as the French or American army. No doubt the Czecho-Slovak men in Russia are anxious to avoid participation in a possible civil war in Russia, but they realize at the same time that by staying where they are they may be able to render far greater service both to Russia and the Allied cause, than if they were transported to France. They are at the orders of the Supreme War Council of the Allies.


DECLARATION OF AIMS BY THE GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES IN INTERVENING IN RUSSIA1
August 3, 1918

In the judgment of the Government of the United States--a judgment arrived at after repeated and very searching consideration of the whole situation--military intervention in Russia would be more likely to add to the present sad confusion there than to cure it, and would injure Russia, rather than help her out of her distress. Such military intervention as has been most frequently proposed, even supposing it to be more efficacious in its immediate object of delivering an attack upon Germany from the east, would, in its judgment, be more likely to turn out to be merely a method of making use of Russia than to be a method of serving her. Her people, if they profit by it at all, could not profit by it in time to deliver them from their present desperate difficulties, and their substance would meantime be used to maintain foreign armies, not to reconstitute their own or to feed their own men, women, and children. We are bending all our energies now to the purpose, the resolute and confident purpose, of winning on the western front, and it would, in the judgment of the Government of the United States, be most unwise to divide or dissipate our forces.

As the Government of the United States sees the present circumstances, therefore, military action is admissible in Russia now only to render such protection and help as is possible to the Czecho- Slovaks against the armed Austrian and German prisoners who are

____________________
1
Current History, September, 1918, p. 465.

-359-

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