Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

a commission of merchants, agricultural experts, and agents of the Young Men's Christian Association accustomed to organizing the best method of spreading useful information and rendering educational help of a modest kind in order in some systematic way to relieve the immediate economic necessities of the people there in every way for which an opportunity may open. The execution of this plan will follow and will not be permitted to embarrass the military assistance rendered to the Czecho-Slovaks.

It is the hope and expectation of the Government of the United Statesthat the Governments with which it is associated will, wher­ ever necessary or possible, lend their active aid in the execution of these military and economic plans.


DECLARATION OF THE JAPANESE GOVERNMENT UPON ITS AIMS IN INTERVENING IN SIBERIA1
August 3, 1918

The Japanese Government, actuated by sentiments of sincere friendship towards the Russian people, have always entertained most sanguine hopes of the speedy reestablishment of order in Russia and of the healthy, untrammeled development of her national life.

Abundant proof, however, is now afforded that the Central European Empires, taking advantage of the defenseless and chaotic conditions in which Russia has momentarily been placed, are consolidating their hold on that country and are steadily extending their activities to Russia's eastern possessions. They have persistently interfered with the passage of Czecho-Slovak troops through Siberia. In the forces now opposing these valiant troops German and Austro-Hungarian prisoners are freely enlisted, and they practically assume a position of command.

The Czecho-Slovak troops, aspiring to secure a free and independent existence for their race and loyally espousing the common cause of the Allies, justly command every sympathy and consideration from the co-belligerents, to whom their destiny is a matter of deep and abiding concern.

In the presence of the danger to which the Czecho-Slovak troops

____________________
1

Current History, September, 1918, p. 466.

-361-

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