Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

not arm Germany with a real wrong. In other words, we shall neither accept ourselves nor impose upon our friends a Brest-Litovsk treaty. Now when a peace of the character I have indicated is secured, we can then proceed with a clear conscience and a steady nerve to build up a new world in which those who have sacrificed so much may dwell in peace, security and content. To establish the new world we must take heed in time lest we fall back into the welter of the old.


ADDRESS OF VICE CHANCELLOR PAYER ON PEACE TERMS1
September 12, 1918

. . . . . . . . . . .

Can any thinking man really expect that this terrible struggle, in which almost the entire world is taking part, will end with a peace of the customary character? Is it believable that the very natural endeavor of the human race to make this war of wars the last will die away unheeded, that the human race, after those sacrifices, will be satisfied with a sort of armistice for a couple of decades and regard war as a quite inevitable evil for all eternity? Governments will conclude the coming peace treaties not alone, but in close harmony with the entire people. The main thing for them in a peace is not the acquisition of peoples, land, treasure and glory. The aim, nowadays, at least, is the conclusion of a lasting peace. Therefore, there will be no peace of conquest. That may mean for our enemies who have made the destruction and political shattering of us and our lives their aim, a disappointment and renunciation which will be almost equivalent to a confession of defeat. Not so for Germany, whose government during the entire war has remained faithful to the Kaiser's word, "The lust of conquest does not animate us," and has thereby demonstrated that its policy was not merely just but farsighted.

Old Russia might have remained capable of existence if she had had that intention and if she had succeeded in granting tolerable conditions of existence to her enslaved races by a federalistic constitution. She collapsed because she could not maintain internal cohesion. Our

____________________
1
Text in The Times, London, September 14, 1918, p. 5. See, also, ibid., September 13, 1918, p. 7.

-383-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 518

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.