Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview
of complete victory. It can be had in no other way. "Peace drives" can be effectively neutralized and silenced only by showing that every victory of the nations associated against Germany brings the nations nearer the sort of peace which will bring security and reassurance to all peoples and make the recurrence of another such struggle of pitiless force and bloodshed forever impossible, and that nothing else can. Germany is constantly intimating the "terms" she will accept; and always finds that the world does not want terms. It wishes the final triumph of justice and fair dealing.
BULGARIA ARMISTICE CONVENTION, SEPTEMBER 29, 19181

Military Convention Regulating the Conditions of Suspension of Hostilities Between the Allied Powers and Bulgaria
1. Immediate evacuation of the territories still occupied by Bulgarians in Greece and Serbia; no cattle, cereals, or provisions to be exported from such territories, which must be left undamaged; the Bulgarian civil administration will continue to function in the parts of Bulgaria actually occupied by the Allies.
2. Immediate demobilization of the entire Bulgarian Army, with the exception of a fighting force comprising 3 divisions of 16 battalions each, 4 regiments of cavalry, which will be employed, 2 divisions for the defense of the east frontier of Bulgaria, and of the Dobrudja and I division for guarding the railways.
3. Surrender at points designated by the high command of the armies of the east of arms, munitions, and military vehicles belonging to the elements demobilized, which will be stored by the Bulgarian authorities and under the control of the Allies. The horses also will be handed over to the Allies.
4. Restitution to Greece of the material of the Fourth Greek Army Corps, taken from the Greek Army at the occupation of eastern Macedonia, in so far that it has not been sent to Germany.
5. The elements of the Bulgarian troops now at the west of the meridian of Uskub will lay down their arms and will be considered, until further order, as prisoners of war; the officers will be allowed to keep their swords.
6. The Bulgarian prisoners of war in the East will be employed
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Senate Document No. 147, 66th Congress, 1st Session.

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Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918
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