Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

selfish violation of the rights of others or for a closing of the struggle for life and death to which our people would be forced without our own fault if the answer to our note of the Powers opposed to us should be dictated by a will to destroy us.

I do not despair over the thought that this second alternative may come. I know the greatness of the mighty powers yet possessed by our people, and I know that the incontrovertible conviction that they were only fighting for our life as a nation would double these powers.

I hope, however, for the sake of all mankind that the President of the United States will receive our offer as we mean it. Then the door would be open to a speedy, honorable peace of justice and reconciliation for us, as well as for our opponents.


GERMAN REQUEST FOR AN ARMISTICE

Chargé d'Affaires of Switzerland to President Wilson1

LEGATION OF SWITZERLAND, WASHINGTON, D. C.

October 6, 1918.

DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN INTEREST

MR. PRESIDENT:

I have the honor to transmit herewith, upon instructions from my government, the original text of a communication from the German Government, received by this Legation late this afternoon, from the Swiss Foreign Office.

An English translation of this communication is also enclosed. The German original text, however, is alone to be considered as authoritative.

Please accept, Mr. President, the assurances of my highest consideration.

(Signed) F. OEDERLIN, Chargé d'Affaires ad interim of Switzerland, In charge of German interests in the United States.

MR. WOODROW WILSON, President of the United States, Washington.

____________________
1
Official U. S. Bulletin, October 9, 1918.

-414-

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