Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

This step was not born of the events of the moment but continually had won its way through in the course of a natural development.

In the circumstances we expect our step will lead to rapprochement and discussion. At the same time in expressing this hope we do not know how the Entente and President Wilson will view this step. It is, however, politically justified on the ground alone that President Wilson represents sole power and is not politically bound to the Entente.

In a formal manner it is also pointed out that our step is not to be interpreted as a request for mediation. This is out of the question, as only a neutral could act as a mediator. We approach President Wilson because the points formulated by him represent a basis on which we could negotiate.

Our step will assuredly be regarded generally as one of great historic moment. In the note it is expressed with full clearness that the much- calumniated Central Powers are pursuing no imperialistic policy, and, moreover, their conditions are in full accord with their program of defense.

Should our proposal not be accepted, then our opponents will have to undertake full responsibility. The note is presented separately because the allies (Teutonic) are represented in America by protecting States--we by Sweden, Germany by Switzerland.

The note at this moment has already been handed to the American Ministers at Stockholm and Berne.


AUSTRIAN REQUEST FOR AN ARMISTICE

Minister of Sweden to the Secretary of State1

LEGATION OF SWEDEN, WASHINGTON, D. C.

(Translation)

October 7, 1918.

EXCELLENCY:

By order of my government I have the honor confidentially to transmit herewith to you the following communication of the Imperial and Royal Government of Austria-Hungary to the President of the United States of America:

____________________
1
Official U. S. Bulletin, October 19, 1918.

-417-

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