Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

ing, and restrictions on personal liberty, but have to do with economic, social and political matters. If local military authorities disagree with the civil officials the decision must be reached immediately by the highest commander who will not be able to promulgate any decision to which agreement is not given by myself or my representative, namely, Secretary of State Gröber. Care will be taken that the state of siege is maintained in the spirit in which I assumed the functions of the Government and in which I am resolved to discharge them.

. . . . . . . . . . .

A bill has been introduced making the Reichstag responsible for war and peace, the measure to become effective when the project for a league of nations shall become operative. The bill provides for the definitive embodiment in the constitution of the fundamental idea of our new system of government. The effect will be to make the Reichstag the people's house of representatives which will be responsible in the decision of the most important question for the nation, namely, of peace and war.

That means peaceful development of the Empire and its relations with other Powers. In such an extension of the people's rights the Imperial Government is willing to lend a hand when a league of nations has taken practical form. When such a league puts an end to all secret separate treaties I am confident that all agreements can be amplified in this sense.


PRESIDENT WILSON'S CONSENT TO PROPOSE AN ARMISTICE TO THE ALLIES

The Secretary of State to the Chargé d' Affaires of Switzerland1

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
WASHINGTON

October 23, 1918.

SIR:

I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your note of the twenty-second transmittting a communication under date of the twen-

____________________
1
Official U. S. Bulletin, October 24, 1918.

-434-

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