Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

into harmony with the principles according to which new elements of dispute and enmity must not be produced which would soon again disturb the peace of Europe and thus of the entire world. I can not conceal from the spokesman of the Poles that the German people's feeling of justice is cut to the quick by every highhanded interpretation of the new principles of international law, and claims to stretches of territory which are vitally bound to the German Empire by history, ethnography, and economic conditions are high-handed. When the spokesman of the Poles puts forward claims for war compensation and sharply criticizes certain measures of the Prussian Government, I need only remind him what Germany has done for the liberation of Poland at the cost of blood and treasure. The Polish spokesman really makes it hard for me to reach the conciliatory conclusion that I intended. Democratic Germany, whose historic attitude to the Polish question is also known to the Poles, has an earnest and sincere desire to live in lasting, peaceful, and friendly relations with the Polish people. This aim is undoubtedly in the interests of the Polish people, whose economic and cultural development requires good relations with the West. This can, however, only be obtained if both sides honestly strive after it.


REPLY OF THE GERMAN GOVERNMENT TO THE NOTE FROM PRESIDENT WILSON CONSENTING TO PROPOSE AN ARMISTICE

Chargé d' Affaires of Switzerland to the Secretary of State1

LEGATION OF SWITZERLAND,
WASHINGTON, D. C.

October 28, 1918.

DEPARTMENT OF
GERMAN INTERESTS.

SIR:

I am instructed by my government and have the honor to submit to Your Excellency the original German text of a communication from the German Government, dated October 27, 1918, which has today been received from the Swiss Foreign Office.

____________________
1
Official U. S. Bulletin, October 29, 1918.

-438-

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