Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

I beg leave also to enclose an English translation of the above- mentioned communication, the German text of which, however, is alone to be considered as authoritative.

Accept, sir, the renewed assurances of my highest consideration.

(Signed) F. OEDERLIN,
Chargé d' Affaires ad interim of Switzerland.

His Excellency,
MR. ROBERT LANSING,
Secretary of State of the United States,
Washington.

Translation of a communication from the German Government, dated October 27, 1918 as transmitted by the Chargé d' Affaires ad interim of Switzerland on October 28, 1918:

The German Government has taken cognizance of the reply of the President of the United States. The President knows the far-reaching changes which have taken place and are being carried out in the German constitutional structure. The peace negotiations are being conducted by a government of the people, in whose hands rests, both actually and constitutionally, the authority to make decisions. The military powers are also subject to this authority. The German Government now awaits the proposals for an armistice, which is the first step toward a peace of justice, as described by the President in his pronouncements. (Signed) SOLF,

State Secretary of Foreign Affairs,
BERLIN, October 27, 1918.


DECREE OF KAISER WILLIAM II AT THE PUBLICATION OF AN AMENDMENT TO THE GERMAN CONSTITUTION1
October 28, 1918

YOUR GRAND DUCAL HIGHNESS : I return herewith for immediate publication the bill to amend the Imperial Constitution and the law of March 17, 1879, relative to the representation of the Imperial Chancellor, which has been laid before me for signature.

On the occasion of this step, which is so momentous for the future history of the German people, I have a desire to give expression to my feelings. Prepared for by a series of Government acts, a new order comes into force which transfers the fundamental rights of the Kaiser's person to the people.

____________________
1
The New York Times, November 4, 1918, p. 1. The decree is addressed to Prince Max. The date in the decree should be of 1878.

-439-

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Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918
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