Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

CONDITIONS IN RUSSIA AT THE TIME OF THE GERMAN ARMISTICE
November 7, 1918

A. DESPATCH RECEIVED BY THE RUSSIAN EMBASSY IN WASHINGTON, NOVEMBER 71

There has been effected a final fusion between the All-Russian Government and the Siberian Gov1 power is now concentrated in the All-Russian Provisional Government.

The Siberian Government has resigned its authority, and the power of the All-Russian Government now extends practically throughout the whole of Siberia and parts of the following provinces liberated from the Bolsheviki and situated in European Russia: Samara, Orenburg, Ufa, Ural, and Archangel. In the latter province the Northern Government, headed by Tchaikovsky, has also submitted to the All- Russian Government, which is headed by Peter V. Vologodsky.


B. TELEGRAM FROM THE ALL-RUSSIAN GOVERNMENT TO PRESIDENT WILSON, NOVEMBER 72

It is evident that the exit of Russia from the number of belligerents and the process of dismemberment which it is suffering has a deep influence on the fate of all the other countries. Furthermore, the problems of the future of Russia should be considered by Governments and nations of the universe as a problem of their own future. Russia will not perish. She is greatly suffering, but not dead. Her national forces are regaining with remarkable quickness, and her effort to recover her unity and greatness will not cease until she attains this sublime aim.

Moreover, the reconstruction of a powerful and prosperous Russia presents itself as a condition necessary to the maintenance of order and international equilibrium. It is, therefore, that the new Provisional Government, into whose hands has been entrusted the supreme power by the people of Russa, the regional governments, the convention,

____________________
1
The New York Times, November 8, 1918, p. 10.
2
Ibid.

-460-

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