Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

ARMISTICE WITH GERMANY
PROCLAMATION OF THE ARMISTICE WITH GERMANY BY PRESIDENT WILSON, NOVEMBER 111

My FELLOW COUNTRYMEN: The armistice was signed this morning. Everything for which America fought has been accomplished. It will now be our fortunate duty to assist by example, by sober friendly counsel, and by material aid in the establishment of just democracy throughout the world.

WOODROW WILSON.


ADDRESS OF PRESIDENT WILSON TO CONGRESS GIVING THE TERMS OF THE ARMISTICE GRANTED TO GERMANY, NOVEMBER 11

GENTLEMEN OF THE CONGRESS: In these anxious times of rapid and stupendous change it will in some degree lighten my sense of responsibility to perform in person the duty of communicating to you some of the larger circumstances of the situation with which it is necessary to deal.

The German authorities, who have at the invitation of the Supreme War Council, been in communication with Marshal Foch, have accepted and signed the terms of armistice which he was authorized and instructed to communicate to them. These terms are as follows:2

The war thus comes to an end; for, having accepted these terms of armistice, it will be impos2mmand to renew it.

It is not now possible to assess the consequences of this great consummation. We know only that this tragical war, whose consuming flames swept from one nation to another, until all the world was on fire, is at an end and that it was the privilege of our own people to enter it at its most critical juncture in such fashion and in such force as to contribute, in a way of which we are all deeply proud, to the great result. We know too, that the object of the war is attained; the object upon which all free men had set their hearts; and attained with a sweeping completeness which even now we do not realize. Armed imperialism such as the men conceived who were but yesterday the masters. of Germany is at an end, its illicit ambitions engulfed in black disaster. Who will now seek to revive it?

____________________
1

Washington, November 11, 10 a. m.; The New York Evening Post, November 11, 1918, p. 1.

1

The President here read the terms of the armistice as given below (first draft).

2
Congressional Record, November 11, 1918, p. 11537.

-474-

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