Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

CONDITIONS OF AN ARMISTICE WITH GERMANY1
Signed November 11, 1918
(Translation)BETWEEN Marshal Foch, Commander-in-Chief of the Allied Armies, acting on behalf of the Allied and Associated Powers, in conjunction with Admiral Wemyss, First Sea Lord, of the one part; and Secretary of State Erzberger, President of the German Delegation, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary Count von Oberndorff, Major-General von Winterfeldt, Captain Vanselow (German Navy), furnished with full powers in due form and acting with the approval of the German Chancellor, of the other part;An Armistice has been concluded on the following conditions:--
CONDITIONS OF THE ARMISTICE CONCLUDED WITH GERMANY

(A)--On the Western Front
1. Cessation of hostilities on land and in the air six hours after the signature of the Armistice.
2. Immediate evacuation of the invaded countries:-- Belgium, France, Luxemburg, as well as Alsace-Lorraine, so ordered as to be completed within fifteen days from the signature of the Armistice. German troops which have not evacuated the above-mentioned territories within the period fixed will be made prisoners of war. Joint occupation by the Allied and United States forces shall keep pace with evacuation in these areas. All movements of evacuation or occupation shall be regulated in accordance with a Note (Annexe No. 1), drawn up at the time of signature of the Armistice.
3. Repatriation, beginning at once, to be completed within fifteen days, of all inhabitants of the countries above enumerated (including hostages, persons under trial, or convicted).
4. Surrender in good condition by the German armies of the following war material:-- 5,000 guns (2,500 heavy, 2,500 field). 25,000 machine-guns. 3,000 trench mortars. 1,700 fighting and bombing aeroplanes--in the first place, all D 7's and all night-bombing aeroplanes.
____________________
1

Miscellaneous Parliamentary Publications, No. 25 ( 1918).

-477-

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