Desiring Voices: Women Sonneteers and Petrarchism

By Mary B. Moore | Go to book overview

Ad Feminam: Women and Literature
Edited by Sandra M. Gilbert
Christina Rossetti The Poetry of Endurance By Dolores Rosenblum
Lunacy of Light Emily Dickinson and the Experience of Metaphor By Wendy Barker
The Literary Existence of Germaine de Staël By Charlotre Hogsett
Margaret Atwood Vision and Forms Edited by Kathryn VanSpanckeren and Jan Garden Castro
He Knew She Was Right The Independent Woman in the Novels of Anthony Trollope By Jane Nardin
The Woman and the Lyre Women Writers in Classical Greece and Rome By Jane McIntosh Snyder
Refiguring the Father New Feminist Readings of Patriarchy Edited by Patricia Yaeger and Beth Kowaleski-Wallace
Writing in the Feminine Feminism and Experimental Writing in Quebec By Karen Gould
Rape and Writing in the Heptaméron of Marguerite de Navarre By Patricia Francis Cholakian
Writing Love Letters, Women, and the Novel in France, 1605-1776 By Katharine Ann Jensen
The Body and the Song Elizabeth Bishop's Poetics By Marilyn May Lombardi
Millay at 100 A Critical Reappraisal Edited by Diane P. Freedman
The House Is Made of Poetry The Art of Ruth Stone Edited by Wendy Barker and Sandra M. Gilbert
The Experimental Self Dialogic Subjectivity in Woolf, Pym, and Brooke-Rose By Judy Little
Claiming a Tradition Italian American Women Writers By Mary Jo Bona

-ii-

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