Desiring Voices: Women Sonneteers and Petrarchism

By Mary B. Moore | Go to book overview

Index
absence, 187-88, 192
Aeneid ( Virgil), 132, 213-14
agency, 83, 85-86, 87, 207, 239-40
alienation, 203
ambiguity (see also indeterminacy;
liminality), 19, 82, 104-7, 175, 249n. 26; moral, 195, 199, 200- 201, 216
angels, liminality of, 179, 186
Anne (queen of England), 129
antiphrasis (see also irony), 38, 40, 239
Aristotle, 48, 80, 81
Arnaut Daniel, 30-31
art, and gender, 166
artists, female. See women: as artists
art/nature opposition, 162
Astrophil and Stella ( Sidney), 7, 21, 150
audience, 33-35; female, 141-42; gen-
dering of, 63-64; Stampa's com-
pared with Petrarch's, 66-67;
women poets and, 235-37
Augustine, 37
Aurora Leigh ( Browning), 161
author (see also fictive poet; male
poet; women poets): female, 4-5,
6, 137, 192-93; fragmentation of,
36; real vs. fictive, 238-40
Baker, Deborah Lesko, 257nn. 12, 15, 258n. 19
Bal, Mieke, 250n. 9
Barthes, Roland, 27, 28
beast, love as, 209-10
beauty, female ideal of, 167-68, 183
Bellay, Joachim du, 8
beloved (see also Count, Stampa's;
Laura), 25, 81-82, 235; death of, 226-28; male, 92, 112-13, 116, 178;
Millay's construction of, 206-7, 222
Belsey, Catherine, 10, 20, 150, 247n. 19
Berriot, Karine, 258n. 18
blazon, 53, 60, 226, 235, 261n. 3;
Labé's use of, 92, 97, 111-13, 116, 259n. 25
blindness, as disguise, 4-o
Bodies That Matter ( Butler), 77
boundaries, 25, 168, 209, 218, 220
Boy, Charles, 4, 98-99
Browning, Elizabeth Barrett (see also
Petrarchism, Browning's revision
of), 3, 5, 11, 160-93, 238; beloved
of, 25, 92, 235; cricket-mandolin
imagery of, 160-61, 181-82; eco-
nomic power and, 159, 177, 180,
183-84; female subjectivity and,
171-74, 241; female worth and,
182, 193, 233; feminism of, 266n. 8;
fire imagery of, 169-70, 185, 186;
floral imagery of, 161-62, 189-92;
life of vs. art of, 164; liminal
themes of, 161-62, 174-75, 177-80, 186-87, 265n. 4; self-deprecation
of, 17, 163; sonnets of, about
George Sand, 25, 165, 166-71
Browning, Robert, 160, 178, 182
Bull-sun imagery, 42-44
Butler, Judith, 77
"Canonization, The" ( Donne), 9
captivity, of women, 167-68, 170
carpe diem theme, 215
Cavalcanti, Guido, 30, 32
chaos, 201, 209; as male, 195, 199, 200
chaste art, 146, 147, 148
childbirth, 118, 130
Christianity (see also Protestantism),
16, 43, 80-81, 133
Cixous, Hélène, 97, 233
class, 127, 261n. 6

-283-

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