Work Time: English Departments and the Circulation of Cultural Value

By Evan Watkins | Go to book overview

FOUR
Work and Value

People will read: what practically all people will do they must be trained how best to do. Assuming that people will read, the question becomes important as to what they will read and how they will read. . . . It must be constantly in the mind of the teacher of literature that the values of utilization and appreciation are dominant in that subject and that high-school pupils are to be trained to utilize and appreciate literature, not to produce it, to become intelligent consumers of literature, not producers nor yet even literary critics. The former function is general and universal: the latter is extremely limited and restricted. 1

Men who are not constantly in close touch with publicity and its problems often look upon advertising as nothing more or less than so many written words. That is why so many literary men, and reporters out of a job, think they can write advertisements. On the contrary, advertising has nothing at all to do with literature. It is salesmanship -- but in advertising the salesman stands behind a printed page instead of a counter. 2

To a remarkable extent these two sets of comments -- the first from Inglis Principles of Secondary Education and the second from The 1909 J. Walter Thompson Blue Book on Advertising -- move in the same world, where more people have available more time and money, and where they will read and will buy. In the mid nineteenth centuryin the United States, as newspapers and magazines proliferated and the population who read them grew larger, a number of individuals began to establish themselves as performing an increasingly useful function of selling advertising space in these media to manufacturers eager for access to potential consumers on a scale never possible before. The service was valuable to the owners of magazines and newspapers, for it meant that the cost of their product to consumers could be lowered considerably; revenues were

-142-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Work Time: English Departments and the Circulation of Cultural Value
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Contents *
  • Introduction 1
  • One - English Departments as Workplaces 11
  • Two - The Possibilities of Political Criticism: Gramsci's Example 45
  • Three - Literary Criticism: Work as Evaluation 77
  • Four - Work and Value 142
  • Five - Cultural Work as Political Resistance 248
  • Reference Matter 277
  • Notes 279
  • Index 287
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 290

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.