American Diplomacy in a New Era

By Stephen D. Kertesz | Go to book overview

10: AMERICAN POLICY TOWARDS THE SATELLITES AND NATIONAL COMMUNISM

John C. Campbell

There has been no more frustrating field for American diplomacy in the past two decades than Eastern Europe. During the Second World War American leaders declared as two of the nation's war aims the restoration of national liberty to peoples forcibly deprived of it and fulfillment of their right to governments of their own choosing. American arms played a major part in the defeat of Germany, but American diplomacy could not bring about a postwar settlement based on the principles of freedom and self-determination in Eastern Europe, where the Soviet Union substituted its own domination for that of the Nazis. Ever since, the United States has deplored that situation as unjust, protested it as a violation of wartime pledges of the Soviet Union, attempted to negotiate about it and to change it, and declared that it cannot be accepted as permanent. Yet, except in the case of Yugoslavia, there has been no basic change in the situation for fifteen years.

Is this outcome a classic example of the futility of diplomacy to right wrongs imposed by force? Is it the result of miscalculations and unwise decisions on the part of American diplomats? Or does it merely illustrate a lack of realism in setting objectives impossible to reach? The record of American policy has already been discussed and debated, attacked and defended, by many persons expert and inexpert, by practitioners of the diplomatic art, candidates for public office, scholars, and interested onlookers. More recently silence has been the order of the day. After 1956 there has seemed to be little to say. Sober analysis, however, will continue to be needed both for an understanding of the past, with the perspective time has provided, and for the decisions of the future.

Some points seem particularly to lend themselves to further examination and cautious speculation: such questions as the relationship

-297-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Diplomacy in a New Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 601

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.