The Causes of the American Revolution

By John C. Wahlke | Go to book overview

Bernhard Knollenberg:


BRITISH PROVOCATIONS IN THE MOVEMENT FOR INDEPENDENCE

Educated at Earlham Collegeand at Harvard University, Bernhard Knollenberghas, even while making major contributions to the writing of American history, pursued several nonacademic careers. (He has been an attorney with a New Yorklaw firm, a librarian at Yale University, an administrator in the Lend-Lease Administration, an intelligence worker in the O.S.S.) In his most recent work, Origin of the American Revolution, 1759-1766, he argues that a major cause of colonial discontent was the series of judgments and decisions made by British policy-makers of the period.

WHILE the British Stamp Act of 1765 greatly contributed to and touched off the colonial uprising of 1765- 1766, the colonists had been brought to the brink of rebellion by a number of other provocative British measures from 1759 to 1764, most of which persisted after the Stamp Act was repealed in 1766 and contributed to the mounting colonial discontent culminating in the American Revolution of 1775-1783.

From 1759 to 1763 the chief causes of colonial discontent were:

The Privy Council's disallowance in 1759 of an important Virginia act accompanied by an order to the Governor of the colony forbidding him to sign any bill passed by the legislature of the colony repealing or amending an existing act, unless the bill contained a clause suspending its operation until approved by the Privy Council in England. Since many acts would be wholly or nearly useless if suspended until thus approved, this order struck at the very roots of self- government in Virginia. Soon afterward Massachusetts and South Carolina were likewise alarmed by steps taken to extend the order to these colonies;

Issuance in 1761 of general writs of assistance empowering officers of the English customs service in Massachusetts to break into and search homes and stores for supposed smuggled goods;

Issuance of an order by the Privy Council in 1761 forbidding governors of the royal colonies to issue judicial or other commissions not revocable at the pleasure of the King, an order particularly disturbing in New York and New Jersey because the judges of the Supreme Court in these colonies had heretofore been granted tenure during good behavior;

The activities from 1759 onward of Thomas Secker, Archbishop of Canterbury, assisted by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts of which he was President, in

From Origin of the American Revolution, 1759-1766, by Bernhard Knollenberg, © Bernhard Knollenberg, 1960. Used by permission of The Macmillan Company.

-50-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Causes of the American Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 134

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.