The Causes of the American Revolution

By John C. Wahlke | Go to book overview

Suggestions for Additional Reading

Louis M. Hacker has argued even more pointedly the viewpoint presented at the opening of this volume in "The First American Revolution," Columbia University Quarterly, Volume XXVII, Number 3, Part I ( September, 1935). A very similar view is expressed by Charles A. and Mary R. Beard in Chapters 5 and 6 of The Rise of American Civilization ( New York, 1934). Charles M. Andrews has summarized his view in "The American Revolution: An Interpretation," American Historical Review, Vol. 31 ( January, 1926); more extensive treatment is given in his The Colonial Background of the American Revolution ( New Haven, 1931), particularly in the final two essays. H. E. Egerton The Causes and Character of the American Revolution ( Oxford and New York, 1923), and W. Alison Phillips, "The Declaration of Independence," Edinburgh Review, Vol. 244 ( July, 1926), 1-17, represent two significant interpretations by British scholars, while Arthur M. Schlesinger's "The American Revolution" in his New Viewpoints in American History ( New York, 1922) presents a further view, in which considerable stress is laid on the role of the merchants.

In most cases, the works mentioned offer interpretive or analytical, rather than narrative, treatment.

For more general considerations of the period, the reader would do well to consult Carl Becker, The Eve of the Revolution ( New York, 1921), in which Becker shows the unfolding constitutional crisis as it might have appeared to Benjamin Franklin watching from England; and Evarts Boutell Greene, The Revolutionary Generation, 1763- 1790(Vol. IV of The History of American Life, New York, 1943), in which the emphasis is on economic and social factors. Sydney George Fisher , The Struggle for American Independence ( 2 vols., Philadelphia, 1908), and Edward Channing, A History of the United States ( New York, 1912), Vol. III, are still among the best general summaries of the period. An excellent summary of the sectional and class divisions of colonial America is to be found in Chapter III of Samuel Eliot Morison and Henry Steele Commager, The Growth of the American Nation ( New York, 1937). Important recent works dealing generally with the revolutionary period and with the issues raised in this volume include John Richard Alden, The American Revolution ( New York, 1954); Lawrence Henry Gipson , The Coming of the Revolution ( New York, 1954); and John C. Miller, Origins of the American Revolution ( Stanford, California, 1959, revised edition of a work originally published in 1943).

There are a number of studies which focus attention upon the influence of particular sections or classes. Among the most useful of these are James Truslow Adams , Revolutionary New England, 1691-1776 ( Boston, 1923), which is written with a distinct economic emphasis;

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