The Letters of Mary Wordsworth, 1800-1855

By Mary Wordsworth; Mary E. Burton | Go to book overview

to the Nab. No doubt we shall have his society for the rest of the day--which I am glad of--he will be company to dear Father, for the House is in a turmoil. We have the whitewasher and the Maidens all busy, that they may have nothing to do after our Babes and their nurse arrive next Tuesday. I hope they will come. I have not heard from Brigham since my last dispatch, which I sent to you. Father wrote to Sir Robert Peel1 yesterday--so I think he is satisfied now that he has made every effort in his power. He sent some letters to Southey which he received and which seemed to urge their exerting themselves in support of the Sergeant--but as we have not even received a reply from S., I suppose he does not mean to stir, even privately, in the matter. Talfourd in his last letter expressed fears that the bill would not pass. This will be most unjust. That wretch2 who has swindled S. out of his £1000 is one of the foremost and fiercest leaders in the opposition to the bill. I send you a paper of Daddys--it speaks its own purport. To think of the Printers and their Devils sending up a petition! Talfourd says that the Publishers have incensed their underlings with the notion that if the bill passes, their trade will be ruined!--

I enclose S. Crackanthorpe's letter received today. Poor G. Strickland and his wife! Are you not surprised to hear of Eliza's expectation, I thought she had done with those interests long ago. God bless you all. I long to hear of the decision about poor Uncle?

M. W.

Address: Miss Wordsworth, Brinsop Court, Hereford.

D.C. MS.


96. TO ISABELLA FENWICK

Rydal Mount. May 3rd [1838]

My dear very dear Friend,

We have this moment read your letter of the 27th and as you are about to leave Bath so soon, I am unwilling that you should do so without your having received our most cordial and affectionate thanks for it. Your report of yourself relieves us from much anxiety, as we have not heard from Dora lately, and when you parted, she told us you were far from well. The weather promises to be much more genial--this is a balmy Spring morning--and I

____________________
1

i.e. 18 Apr. 1838. See L.Y., p. 923.

2
Apparently Mr. Wakley. See L.Y., p. 931.

-211-

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The Letters of Mary Wordsworth, 1800-1855
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Letters ix
  • Abbreviations and References Used in This Volume xvi
  • Introduction xvii
  • 1. to John Monkhouse1 26 October 1800 1
  • 2. to Catherine Clarkson 1
  • 3. to Thomas Monkhouse 4
  • 4. to John Monkhouse 4
  • 5. to Sarah Hutchinson 6
  • 6. to Sarah Hutchinson 7
  • 7. to Sarah Hutchinson 8
  • 9. to Dorothy Wordsworth 12
  • 10. to Thomas Monkhouse 16
  • 11. to Dorothy Wordsworth 21
  • 12. to Thomas Monkhouse 22
  • 13. to Thomas Monkhouse 27
  • 14. to Thomas Monkhouse 29
  • 15. to Thomas Monkhouse† 30
  • 16. to Thomas Monkhouse 31
  • 17. to Thomas Monkhouse 32
  • 18. to Thomas Monkhouse 36
  • 20. to Thomas Monkhouse 38
  • 21. to Sarah Hutchinson 41
  • 23. to Thomas Monkhouse 42
  • 24. to Thomas Monkhouse 44
  • 25. to Thomas Monkhouse 51
  • 27. to Thomas Monkhouse 53
  • 29. to Sarah Hutchinson 53
  • 30. to Sarah Hutchinson 55
  • 31. to Sarah Hutchinson 59
  • 32. to Sarah Hutchinson 64
  • 34. to Thomas Monkhouse 67
  • 35. to Thomas Monkhouse 71
  • 37. to John Monkhouse 71
  • 38. to Thomas Monkhouse 75
  • 40. to Thomas Monkhouse 81
  • 42. to Edward Quillinan 83
  • 43. to Edward Quillinan 87
  • 45. to Edward Quillinan 91
  • 47. to Edward Quillinan 93
  • 48. to Edward Quillinan 98
  • 49. to Joanna Hutchinson 99
  • 50. to Edward Quillinan 103
  • 53. to Thomas Monkhouse 108
  • 54. to Thomas Monkhouse 114
  • 56. to Edward Quillinan 116
  • 57. to Edward Quillinan 118
  • 58. to Edward Quillinan 120
  • 59. to Edward Quillinan 124
  • 61. to Edward Quillinan 125
  • 64. to Edward Quillinan 130
  • 65. to Edward Quillinan 133
  • 66. to Jane Marshall 134
  • 67. to W. Wordsworth, Junr 138
  • 68. to W. W., Junr 139
  • 70. to Isabella Fenwick 141
  • 71. to Isabella Fenwick 143
  • 72. to Mary Hutchinson 148
  • 74. to Thomas Hutchinson, Junr 149
  • 75. to Isabella Fenwick 154
  • 77. to Dora W. 156
  • 78. to W. W 158
  • 79. to Dora Wordsworth 164
  • 81. to Dora Wordsworth 166
  • 82. to W. W. 170
  • 85. to Dora Wordsworth and W. W. 179
  • 86. to W. W., Dora W.,T. and M. Hutchinson 186
  • 87. to Dora Wordsworth 190
  • 89. to Edward Ferguson 191
  • 90. to Dora Wordsworth 193
  • 91. to Dora Wordsworth 198
  • 93. to Dora Wordsworth 202
  • 94. to Thomas and Mary Hutchinson 204
  • 95. to Dora Wordsworth 208
  • 96. to Isabella Fenwick 210
  • 97. to Mary Hutchinson 211
  • 98. to Mary Hutchinson 213
  • 99. to Dora Wordsworth 215
  • 100. to Dora Wordsworth 219
  • 101. to Dora Wordsworth 224
  • 102. to Dora Wordsworth 225
  • 103. to Dora Wordsworth 228
  • 104. to Dora Wordsworth 233
  • 105. to Isabella Fenwick 237
  • 106. to Isabella Fenwick 238
  • 107. to Isabella Fenwick 239
  • 108. to C. W. Junr 241
  • 109. to Susan Wordsworth 243
  • 110. to Isabella Fenwick 246
  • 111. to Isabella Fenwick 247
  • 113. to Isabella Fenwick 252
  • 115. to Isabella Fenwick 254
  • 117. to Isabella Fenwick 260
  • 118. to Isabella Fenwick 266
  • 119. to Isabella Fenwick 267
  • 121. to Isabella Fenwick 271
  • 122. to Catherine Clarkson 273
  • 124. to William Wordsworth, Junr 274
  • 126. to Fanny Graham 277
  • 128. to Mary Hutchinson 278
  • 129. to Mary Hutchinson 280
  • 131. to Mary Hutchinson 281
  • 132. to Mary Hutchinson 284
  • 134. to Isabella Fenwick 284
  • 135. to Isabella Fenwick 285
  • 136. to Isabella Fenwick 288
  • 137. to Isabella Fenwick 289
  • 138. to Mary Hutchinson 292
  • 139. to Isabella Fenwick 295
  • 140. to Isabella Fenwick 296
  • 141. to Ebba Hutchinson 299
  • 143. to Thomas and Mary Hutchinson 303
  • 144. to Thomas and Mary Hutchinson 306
  • 145. to Isabella Fenwick 307
  • 146. to Thomas Hutchinson and Family 308
  • 147. to Mary Hutchinson 310
  • 148. to John Monkhouse 312
  • 149. to Mary Hutchinson 313
  • 150. to Mary Hutchinson 314
  • 151. to Isabella Fenwick 315
  • 152. to Mary Hutchinson 319
  • 153. to W. Wordsworth, Junr 320
  • 154. to W. Wordsworth, Junr 321
  • 155. to Susan Wordsworth1 322
  • 156. to W. Wordsworth, Junr 324
  • 157. to Mary Hutchinson 326
  • 159. to Elizabeth Hutchinson 328
  • 161. to Mary Hutchinson 331
  • 163. to the Thomas Hutchinsons 332
  • 164. to Elizabeth Hutchinson 335
  • 165. to the Hutchinsons 336
  • 167. to Mary Hutchinson 337
  • 169. to Susan Wordsworth 339
  • 170. to Isabella Fenwick 341
  • 171. to Isabella Fenwick 345
  • 173. to Isabella Fenwick 346
  • 174. to Isabella Fenwick 347
  • 176. to Mary Hutchinson 350
  • 177. to Mary Hutchinson 351
  • 178. to Susan Wordsworth 352
  • Index 355
  • The Hutchinson Family 365
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