The Letters of Mary Wordsworth, 1800-1855

By Mary Wordsworth; Mary E. Burton | Go to book overview

D.C. MS.


156. TO W. WORDSWORTH, JUNR

30th October 1850

My dear William,

As you request me to give you in writing the circumstances under which your dear Father made the arrangement with Christopher that he should prepare such a brief memoir to be published with his Biographical Poem (after his death) as might be necessary to illustrate his Works, I will endeavour, to the best of my recollection to do so as nearly as I can in the words in which I recalled the circumstance to the mind of Dr. W., soon after he had commenced his work--and he observed, what I said, was perfectly correct.

The conversation turned upon the Biography of Authors--and Christopher's opinions seemed to be so perfectly in accord with your Father's (to you who have so often heard him speak so strongly on the subject, I need not repeat that he thought an Author's-- especially a Poet's works, were the only biography the world had any right to call for) that after C. left the room, I observed to your Father 'you would do well to appoint Chris: your Biographer'. I well remember his answer was 'Do you think so--he has too much to do to take the trouble' to which I replied 'Let us ask him'. I did so, and he readily agreed, saying he should, if it was his Uncle's wish, have much pleasure in undertaking the office and to be of any use in his power to his family.

So it was settled. And afterwards, the same morning, Dr. W. expressed his desire that he should have a written memorandum of what had been settled. Upon my telling your Father this--he said 'Well then give him one'--I then wrote the one Chr: holds: (you know dear Father, since poor Dora's death, mostly threw these little matters of business upon me), and after he had read and approved what I had written, he signed the Paper, and I took it to Dr. Wordsworth, who having read it, said it was all he wanted, to shew what authority was given him--but said he, 'you, Aunt, sign it also'--I did so, and no more was then said.

Some time afterwards, a 2nd Mem: was sent to him, referring him, when the time came, to Miss F., Mr. Q., Mr. Robinson and Mr. Carter, who were best able to be of use to him in the drawing up such a memoir as was then contemplated--

M. WORDSWORTH

Your Father afterwards, at Susan's request, dictated to her some family historical notices, such as dates, etc., but I was not aware that this was with a view of publication.

-324-

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The Letters of Mary Wordsworth, 1800-1855
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Letters ix
  • Abbreviations and References Used in This Volume xvi
  • Introduction xvii
  • 1. to John Monkhouse1 26 October 1800 1
  • 2. to Catherine Clarkson 1
  • 3. to Thomas Monkhouse 4
  • 4. to John Monkhouse 4
  • 5. to Sarah Hutchinson 6
  • 6. to Sarah Hutchinson 7
  • 7. to Sarah Hutchinson 8
  • 9. to Dorothy Wordsworth 12
  • 10. to Thomas Monkhouse 16
  • 11. to Dorothy Wordsworth 21
  • 12. to Thomas Monkhouse 22
  • 13. to Thomas Monkhouse 27
  • 14. to Thomas Monkhouse 29
  • 15. to Thomas Monkhouse† 30
  • 16. to Thomas Monkhouse 31
  • 17. to Thomas Monkhouse 32
  • 18. to Thomas Monkhouse 36
  • 20. to Thomas Monkhouse 38
  • 21. to Sarah Hutchinson 41
  • 23. to Thomas Monkhouse 42
  • 24. to Thomas Monkhouse 44
  • 25. to Thomas Monkhouse 51
  • 27. to Thomas Monkhouse 53
  • 29. to Sarah Hutchinson 53
  • 30. to Sarah Hutchinson 55
  • 31. to Sarah Hutchinson 59
  • 32. to Sarah Hutchinson 64
  • 34. to Thomas Monkhouse 67
  • 35. to Thomas Monkhouse 71
  • 37. to John Monkhouse 71
  • 38. to Thomas Monkhouse 75
  • 40. to Thomas Monkhouse 81
  • 42. to Edward Quillinan 83
  • 43. to Edward Quillinan 87
  • 45. to Edward Quillinan 91
  • 47. to Edward Quillinan 93
  • 48. to Edward Quillinan 98
  • 49. to Joanna Hutchinson 99
  • 50. to Edward Quillinan 103
  • 53. to Thomas Monkhouse 108
  • 54. to Thomas Monkhouse 114
  • 56. to Edward Quillinan 116
  • 57. to Edward Quillinan 118
  • 58. to Edward Quillinan 120
  • 59. to Edward Quillinan 124
  • 61. to Edward Quillinan 125
  • 64. to Edward Quillinan 130
  • 65. to Edward Quillinan 133
  • 66. to Jane Marshall 134
  • 67. to W. Wordsworth, Junr 138
  • 68. to W. W., Junr 139
  • 70. to Isabella Fenwick 141
  • 71. to Isabella Fenwick 143
  • 72. to Mary Hutchinson 148
  • 74. to Thomas Hutchinson, Junr 149
  • 75. to Isabella Fenwick 154
  • 77. to Dora W. 156
  • 78. to W. W 158
  • 79. to Dora Wordsworth 164
  • 81. to Dora Wordsworth 166
  • 82. to W. W. 170
  • 85. to Dora Wordsworth and W. W. 179
  • 86. to W. W., Dora W.,T. and M. Hutchinson 186
  • 87. to Dora Wordsworth 190
  • 89. to Edward Ferguson 191
  • 90. to Dora Wordsworth 193
  • 91. to Dora Wordsworth 198
  • 93. to Dora Wordsworth 202
  • 94. to Thomas and Mary Hutchinson 204
  • 95. to Dora Wordsworth 208
  • 96. to Isabella Fenwick 210
  • 97. to Mary Hutchinson 211
  • 98. to Mary Hutchinson 213
  • 99. to Dora Wordsworth 215
  • 100. to Dora Wordsworth 219
  • 101. to Dora Wordsworth 224
  • 102. to Dora Wordsworth 225
  • 103. to Dora Wordsworth 228
  • 104. to Dora Wordsworth 233
  • 105. to Isabella Fenwick 237
  • 106. to Isabella Fenwick 238
  • 107. to Isabella Fenwick 239
  • 108. to C. W. Junr 241
  • 109. to Susan Wordsworth 243
  • 110. to Isabella Fenwick 246
  • 111. to Isabella Fenwick 247
  • 113. to Isabella Fenwick 252
  • 115. to Isabella Fenwick 254
  • 117. to Isabella Fenwick 260
  • 118. to Isabella Fenwick 266
  • 119. to Isabella Fenwick 267
  • 121. to Isabella Fenwick 271
  • 122. to Catherine Clarkson 273
  • 124. to William Wordsworth, Junr 274
  • 126. to Fanny Graham 277
  • 128. to Mary Hutchinson 278
  • 129. to Mary Hutchinson 280
  • 131. to Mary Hutchinson 281
  • 132. to Mary Hutchinson 284
  • 134. to Isabella Fenwick 284
  • 135. to Isabella Fenwick 285
  • 136. to Isabella Fenwick 288
  • 137. to Isabella Fenwick 289
  • 138. to Mary Hutchinson 292
  • 139. to Isabella Fenwick 295
  • 140. to Isabella Fenwick 296
  • 141. to Ebba Hutchinson 299
  • 143. to Thomas and Mary Hutchinson 303
  • 144. to Thomas and Mary Hutchinson 306
  • 145. to Isabella Fenwick 307
  • 146. to Thomas Hutchinson and Family 308
  • 147. to Mary Hutchinson 310
  • 148. to John Monkhouse 312
  • 149. to Mary Hutchinson 313
  • 150. to Mary Hutchinson 314
  • 151. to Isabella Fenwick 315
  • 152. to Mary Hutchinson 319
  • 153. to W. Wordsworth, Junr 320
  • 154. to W. Wordsworth, Junr 321
  • 155. to Susan Wordsworth1 322
  • 156. to W. Wordsworth, Junr 324
  • 157. to Mary Hutchinson 326
  • 159. to Elizabeth Hutchinson 328
  • 161. to Mary Hutchinson 331
  • 163. to the Thomas Hutchinsons 332
  • 164. to Elizabeth Hutchinson 335
  • 165. to the Hutchinsons 336
  • 167. to Mary Hutchinson 337
  • 169. to Susan Wordsworth 339
  • 170. to Isabella Fenwick 341
  • 171. to Isabella Fenwick 345
  • 173. to Isabella Fenwick 346
  • 174. to Isabella Fenwick 347
  • 176. to Mary Hutchinson 350
  • 177. to Mary Hutchinson 351
  • 178. to Susan Wordsworth 352
  • Index 355
  • The Hutchinson Family 365
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