Public Men in and out of Office

By J. T. Salter | Go to book overview

3
JOSEPH CLARK GREW "Decade of Infamy"

BY CHARLES E. MARTIN

WITH ONE-THIRD OF HIS LIFE FIRMLY ANCHORED IN THE nineteenth century, and with upwards of two-thirds of it spanning the twentieth, Joseph Clark Grew, one of America's great diplomats of this generation was born on May 27, 1880. His father was Edward Sturgis Grew, a Boston businessman, and his mother was Annie Crawford Clark. The best of New England is found in his ancestry, environment, and education. His family had both economic substance and social position. It stems from British and Revolutionary origins and was connected by marriage with the first families of New England.

His education followed a traditional pattern for the young men of his region and station in life. Entering Groton at the age of twelve, he finished in 1898. And as night follows day, he matriculated at Harvard, graduating in 1902. His education, while satisfying and fruitful in every way, does not appear to have been strikingly eventful. It was in preparation for, but not prophetic of the dynamic career, in the midst of power politics, which was to follow.

To "top off" his education, and to broaden his perspective before entering upon the accustomed family business responsibilities, young Grew set out to "see the world," which meant, in the main, hunting in the jungles of Asia. This journey was filled with a variety of experiences, including fortune and adversity. In the Malay peninsula he contracted malaria and had to repair to India to recuperate. There he did some exciting hunting of minor game. It was in China that he bagged his

-36-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Public Men in and out of Office
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 518

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.