Public Men in and out of Office

By J. T. Salter | Go to book overview

19
TOM CONNALLY "One of the Senate Gallery's Favorites"

BY OTIS MILLER AND ANITA F. ALPERN

THE PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE FIND A COMMON MEETing ground in American politics; and the future destiny of the United States and of the world will, to an unknown extent, be shaped by Tom Connally, senior senator from Texas, who is the Chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Since Senator Lodge prevented the approval of President Wilson's world-embracing peace movement in 1920, no one has doubted the inherent power of this position. Before the outbreak of World War II, the Foreign Relations Committee had acted on the ship-arming bill, lease-lend legislation, the bill to revise the Neutrality Act, and all other matters pertaining to our foreign policy. After Pearl Harbor, the difficulties in dealing with neutral nations, governments in exile, were part of this committee's work. Important as these matters were, the committee's role is even more compelling in shaping the peace, and the willing or unwilling recipient of these huge responsibilities is Tom Connally.

He is big and broad, with blue eyes, and wavy streaked gray hair curled up at the ends like the curl on the north end of a south-bound mallard duck. Connally's appearance and garb have fixed him indelibly in the political mind of the nation. His black suit cut along political lines, his stiff-bosomed shirts, his flowing black silk ribbons for his glasses or his watch, his black string tie--all once led the late Joe Bailey to remark, "Tom Connally is the only man in the U.S. Senate who could wear a Roman Toga and not look like a fat man in a nightgown."

-311-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Public Men in and out of Office
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 518

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.