Public Men in and out of Office

By J. T. Salter | Go to book overview

20
JERRY VOORHIS "What Is Right Rather Than What Is Expedient"

BY CLAUDIUS 0. JOHNSON

MR. SPEAKER, CAN DEMOCRACY SURVIVE? THIS IS THE overshadowing question of this age. . . . What has de- stroyed democracy in the nations that have lost it? I am convinced it has been the unsolved economic problems which have produced unemployment, fear, and insecurity for the people of those nations. Can a people solve that problem without loss of liberty? If it cannot, democracy is doomed. If it can, then democracy is sure to win in the long run."1CongressmanJerry Voorhis, representing California's Twelfth District, has no doubt that democracy can solve the problem. To change "can solve" to "has solved" is the task to which he has dedicated himself. Omnivorously he reads, constantly he studies, gratefully he listens to the suggestions of his friends and co-workers, insistently yet patiently and modestly he proposes and expounds to his colleagues in the House, and fervently he prays to his God. Without drama, without the use of flags or other symbols, without partisan appeals or recriminations, but also without an obvious saving sense of humor, and not without occasional discouragement he serves the people sixteen hours a day.


I

Horace Jeremiah Voorhis, the son of Charles Brown and Ella Smith Voorhis, was born at Ottawa, Kansas, April 6, 1901. His parents, both in their intrinsic worth and in their

____________________
1
Congressional Record, Seventy-seventh Congress, First Session ( Apr. 2, 1941), p. 2944.

-322-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Public Men in and out of Office
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 518

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.