ILLUSTRATIONS
I. Cover.

Detail of portrait with the bust of Shakespeare, painted by Thomas Gainsborough, 1769, for Stratford-upon-Avon new Town Hall.

II. Garrick with the Bust of Shakespeare. (91½" X 59½".) Frontispiece

By Thomas Gainsborough.

Painted for Stratford-upon-Avon Town Hall, 1769.

Gainsborough was paid, by the Corporation, £63 for this portrait, which was considered by Mrs Garrick the best likeness of her husband. Horace Walpole identified the temple and bridge in the background as that at Prior Park, near Bath, the residence until 1769 of Garrick's friend William Warburton, Bishop of Gloucester. The original picture was destroyed by fire at Stratford-upon-Avon, 1946.

Engraved by Valentine Green, April 2, 1769.

Reproduced by kind permission of the Governors, the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre, Picture Gallery & Museum, Stratford-upon-Avon.

III. Garrick as Richard III. (75" X 98½".) Facing page41

By William Hogarth.

Engraved by Hogarth and Grignion, 1746.

This portrait was originally bought by Mrs Duncombe of Duncombe Park, from Hogarth, and descended by inheritance to the Earls of Feversham. It was bought in 1956, from Agnews, by the Walker Art Gallery of Liverpool. Garrick first appeared as Richard at Goodman's Fields, October 19, 1741. When about to retire, he announced, "I gained my fame by Richard, and mean to end by it," but he eventually ended his career in a comedy part, on June 10, 1776, and appeared as Richard for the last time at a Royal Command performance three days earlier. Sheridan thought his Richard"fine but not terrible enough", which provoked from Mrs Siddons, who had played Lady Anne, "God bless me! What could be more terrible?"

Reproduced by kind permission of the Trustees, the Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool.

-xi-

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David Garrick
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Garrick Pedigree vii
  • Illustrations xi
  • Prologue xv
  • Chapter 1 - "First, the Infant" 1717-1737 1
  • Chapter II - Salad Days 1737-1742 19
  • Chapter III - Woffington 1742-1745 50
  • Chapter IV - 1745-1749 84
  • Chapter V - 27, Southampton Street 1749-1751 116
  • Chapter VI - Happy Days 1751-1755 142
  • Chapter VII - Danger 1755-1756 169
  • Chapter VIII - 1757-1760 184
  • Chapter IX - The New Reign 1760-1763 211
  • Chapter X - 1763-1765 227
  • Chapter XI - "Tied to the Stake" 1765-1769 258
  • Chapter XII - Stratford-Upon-Avon Jubilee 1769 285
  • Chapter XIII - Adelphi 1770-1776 307
  • Chapter XIV - "Farewell! Remember Me!" 1776-1779 335
  • Epilogue 374
  • Notes 384
  • Index 407
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