CHAPTER XIII
ADELPHI 1770-1776

I

As long ago as the summer of 1768, John Paterson, calling at the theatre to get some seats, had met George Garrick and asked searchingly after David. "From some oracular answers to some of my inquiries, I had reason to suspect that all is not well in Denmark. Some dark hints of your being disgusted, and resolved to quit the stage, have alarmed me." David was not to quit the stage yet, but he had been considering it ever since he returned from his Grand Tour, and he was beginning to make his preparations. The first of these was a move from Southampton Street.

In 1769, the brothers Adam had begun to build, above a system of subterranean vaults on the slope between the Strand and the Thames, a series of classical streets and riverside terraces--the Adelphi, directly inspired by the palace of Diocletian on the Bay of Spalato. Adelphi Terrace was the centre-piece of their design. They had to reclaim land from the Thames, and the Corporation of London, who declared that they possessed legal rights to the bed and soil of the river, opposed them for two years. After obtaining a Bill for this, they had to proceed with a second bill sanctioning the disposal of the property by lottery. Lord Mansfield, for whom they had designed Ken Wood, near Hampstead, was interested. People were beginning to put their names down for houses. Number 5, later to be re-numbered 4, was allotted on plans to David Garrick Esq. He would have as nearest neighbour Dr Turton, physician to Lord Mansfield's family, and the man who had attended him in his dangerous illness at Munich. There were several reasons for a move from Southampton Street. The old house had been very convenient for the theatre, but he would not be much further in the Adelphi, and he would be much quieter. Also, he was not in such close attendance, as far as acting went. There was a sentimental reason. The area for which the brothers Adam had got a ninety-nine-years lease, covered Durham Yard, where Garrick and Co. had set up their wine-business, and had their vaults, and office, in 1739. The new houses, which were to be of surpassing elegance would, like Garrick's Villa at Hampton, command a superb view of the Thames. The

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David Garrick
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Garrick Pedigree vii
  • Illustrations xi
  • Prologue xv
  • Chapter 1 - "First, the Infant" 1717-1737 1
  • Chapter II - Salad Days 1737-1742 19
  • Chapter III - Woffington 1742-1745 50
  • Chapter IV - 1745-1749 84
  • Chapter V - 27, Southampton Street 1749-1751 116
  • Chapter VI - Happy Days 1751-1755 142
  • Chapter VII - Danger 1755-1756 169
  • Chapter VIII - 1757-1760 184
  • Chapter IX - The New Reign 1760-1763 211
  • Chapter X - 1763-1765 227
  • Chapter XI - "Tied to the Stake" 1765-1769 258
  • Chapter XII - Stratford-Upon-Avon Jubilee 1769 285
  • Chapter XIII - Adelphi 1770-1776 307
  • Chapter XIV - "Farewell! Remember Me!" 1776-1779 335
  • Epilogue 374
  • Notes 384
  • Index 407
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