EPILOGUE

1

By ten o'clock on the morning of Monday, February 1, 1779, streets all along the route from Adelphi Terrace to Westminster Abbey were filling fast, and by quarter past one, when the cortège set out, even house-tops were thronged, and there were so many spectators in carriages that a complete traffic block resulted. Big crowds had been foreseen, and a detachment of military cavalry cleared a passage, and was ready to keep order, but it was remarked that the onlookers who had gathered to see Garrick take his last journey gave, by their mournful silence and good behaviour, the most evident demonstration of their woe.

The day was very fine and mild. The tolling of the bells of St Martin's and the Abbey "smote upon the very soul" of Hannah More, cowering in a hackney-coach with Miss Cadogan. There were multitudes striving for admittance at the cloister entrance, and she supposed that no man in England had ever had so many particular friends.

It was the most magnificent funeral that London had ever witnessed. The head of the procession arrived outside the Abbey after about an hour, but another hour passed before fifty mourning coaches had discharged their distinguished occupants, and the Dean and Chapter advanced to meet the coffin, to the strains of Purcell's anthem. The list of pall-bearers looked impressive; all were in fact close friends--LordCamden, Earl of Ossory, Right Hon. Richard Rigby, Hon. Hans Stanley, Duke of Devonshire, Earl Spencer, Viscount Palmerston, Sir Watkin Williams Wynn, John Paterson Esq., Albany Wallis Esq. Sheridan, with two attendants bearing up his black velvet train, was chief mourner. From Drury Lane had come the Treasurer, Housekeeper, Book-keeper and Carpenter, and a dozen "gentlemen of the theatre", including King, Smith, Moody, Palmer, Baddeley and an Aickin. Covent Garden list of twelve also showed an Aicken. There were six coaches filled with Gentlemen of the Literary Club, and eleven simply styled "intimate friends". Garrick's family was represented by three nephews, and one niece's husband. The Bishop of Rochester read the service, in a very low voice. As the coffin was lowered under the pavement of Poets' Corner, at the foot of Shakespeare's monument, the sobs of Burke broke the silence, and Cumberland noticed "old Samuel Johnson" bathed in tears. All the long way to the Abbey he had

-374-

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David Garrick
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Garrick Pedigree vii
  • Illustrations xi
  • Prologue xv
  • Chapter 1 - "First, the Infant" 1717-1737 1
  • Chapter II - Salad Days 1737-1742 19
  • Chapter III - Woffington 1742-1745 50
  • Chapter IV - 1745-1749 84
  • Chapter V - 27, Southampton Street 1749-1751 116
  • Chapter VI - Happy Days 1751-1755 142
  • Chapter VII - Danger 1755-1756 169
  • Chapter VIII - 1757-1760 184
  • Chapter IX - The New Reign 1760-1763 211
  • Chapter X - 1763-1765 227
  • Chapter XI - "Tied to the Stake" 1765-1769 258
  • Chapter XII - Stratford-Upon-Avon Jubilee 1769 285
  • Chapter XIII - Adelphi 1770-1776 307
  • Chapter XIV - "Farewell! Remember Me!" 1776-1779 335
  • Epilogue 374
  • Notes 384
  • Index 407
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