The Early Novel of the Southwest

By Edwin W. Gaston Jr. | Go to book overview

EPILOGUE
SOUTHWESTERN FICTION
SINCE 1918

FROM THE ROOTS of the early novel, Southwestern fiction has grown significantly. In the wake of World War I came a shift in emphasis from romance to realism--a change occasioned in large measure by the times, including the drift of national letters, whose influence, due to a chronic regional cultural lag, became pronounced belatedly. The transformation, however, has been as gradual as that of other literatures, and it has obviously not resulted in the demise of romance. A spate of cowboy stories of the Luke Short variety, for example, testifies to the persistence of a naive romance reminiscent of the old "dime" novels. The growth of post-1918 Southwestern fiction, again like that of other literatures, has not been continuous; rather it has been in bursts followed by moments of dormancy that preceded the next maturation. Nevertheless, the sum total of the process has been that fiction now stands above the other types of literary expression in the region. This fictional achievement, moreover, has been accomplished both by authors who had become established elsewhere before writing of the Southwest and by those who are native to the area. In their works, these writers have demonstrated two major tendencies: to portray the past and to record and criticize the present scene. Such emphases, as

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The Early Novel of the Southwest
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Chapter I- Introduction 3
  • Chapter II- A General Survey 31
  • Chapter III- Plot Types and Techniques 45
  • Chapter IV- Character Portrayal 82
  • Chapter V- Impressions of Geography 123
  • Chapter VI- Intellectual and Philosophical Concepts 156
  • Chapter VII- Conclusion 189
  • Epilogue- Southwestern Fiction since 1918 195
  • Appendixes 209
  • Appendix II- The Authors 263
  • Related Studies 288
  • Bibliography 292
  • Index 303
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