Personality: Development and Assessment

By Charles M. Harsh; H. G. Schrickel | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 4
Mechanisms of Behavior Development

With purely descriptive measures it is difficult to show continuity of personality through the period of growth when an individual's capacities and impulses change at various rates so that he may not even keep the same rank among agemates. At each age, unique experiences contribute to further variations of behavior. Some of these are temporary, and even the lasting effects are likely to be expressed in different overt behavior at successive ages. Here is a major challenge to theorists who postulate enduring instincts or habits or motives. If outward manifestations are so variable, the enduring uniformities must be traced to hidden processes within the individual. According to their preferences, various theorists have explained these processes in terms of psychic forces, chemical equilibria, neural connections, social pressures, or abstract mathematical equations. Such speculations are useful if they encourage a search for previously unsuspected relationships between events in the life of an individual. From such knowledge we may eventually discover the threads of continuity in changing behavior.

Although everyone agrees that behavior is an outgrowth of experience and motivation, there is disagreement as to how learning occurs and how motives arise. The lack of adequate theory is a serious handicap, for personality development cannot be understood properly without a correct concept of the determinants of behavior. Some useful insights have been gained by observing behavior differences related to inheritance, to growth and health, to family patterns, and to child care; yet these relationships will remain

-71-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Personality: Development and Assessment
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 536

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.