INTRODUCTION

JOSEPH DE MARLIAVE wrote the Essai sur les Quatuors de Beethoven, included in the Études musicales,1 as an introduction to this book; it would have seemed natural to reproduce it here together with other unpublished notes, but on examination it was found that the fact of its separate publication made it too complete in itself to be incorporated here as it stood. Yet the necessity for some statement of explanation concerning the manuscript, left as we know in a fragmentary state, and the desirability of presenting some general points of view on certain aspects of so wide a subject, have led me to collect and form into a new introduction all that will help to determine the scope of the work and so heighten its significance.2

The manuscript that Mme de Marliave has put into my hands for the purpose of publication consists of some finished studies, some partly finished, some only sketched out, and many rough drafts and notes. I have arranged the whole matter in due order and completed it with additions, especially in the detail of analysis of the last quartets, in order to prepare as unified a text as possible for the press.

In regard to the essential matter of the book, I have of course been prompted by the ordinary demands of good faith to respect unfalteringly the critical dicta of J. de Marliave. I have only allowed myself the task of developing according to my own knowledge the elements of objective analysis contained in the notes

____________________
1
J. de Marliave, Études musicales, Paris, Alcan, 1917, pp. 216 onwards.
2
Several passages in this introduction contain fragments, not published in 1917, of the Essai sur les Qualuors.

-ix-

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