The United States and the Problem of Recovery after 1893

By Gerald T. White | Go to book overview

Chapter VII
Agriculture and Recovery*

As the fiscal year 1897 drew to its close, Bradstreet's surveyed the contemporary scene and observed, "There is no boom and has been none in any staple commercial or industrial line this year or in any preceding year since the panic of 1893." In fact, in their survey they said that, except for certain western cities, conditions in the latter part of June seemed less satisfactory than those two or three months earlier. The Commercial and Financial Chronicle, while not so pessimistic, was sure no great improvement had been made. 1

Senator Mark Hanna, the chief architect of the Republican prosperity campaign of 1896, said at the time of the great bituminous coal strike of 1897, "Owing to the existing conditions of business, no one can be expected to raise wages anywhere in any line of business, and therefore the strikers have chosen a very unfortunate time to make their demands whether the latter be reasonable or not." 2 The distinguished economist J. Laurence Laughlin, in an article entitled "The McKinley Administration and Prosperity" in the July issue of Forum, saw no immediate promise of that longed- for event. He believed that the fear of silver was but temporarily abated, and no remedial legislation had been enacted. As for industry, it was prostrate and could not be expected to revive at once. 3

Yet despite these general indications of gloom, by the close of the year 1897 the process of recovery was well advanced and well publicized. The reports in the newspapers and magazines were almost unanimous in their opinion that this recovery had started in the West, but the spread of recovery was reported also, to a lesser extent, in the East. The reports with respect to causative factors in recovery gave heavy emphasis to improved agricultural conditions,

____________________
*
Some of the material in this chapter has been published in my article "Economic Recovery and the Wheat Crop of 1897," Agricultural History 13 ( January 1939): 13-21.

-71-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The United States and the Problem of Recovery after 1893
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Chapter I- The Panic of 1893 1
  • Chapter II- A First Answer of Government 8
  • Chapter III- The Problem of Belief and the Unemployed 21
  • Chapter IV- The Tariff of 1894 33
  • Chapter V- The Bond Issues 41
  • Chapter VI- A Second Answer of Government 56
  • Chapter VII- Agriculture and Recovery 71
  • Chapter VIII- Exports of Manufactures and Recovery 82
  • Chapter IX- Recovery in 1898 91
  • Chapter X - An Overview and a "Legacy" 102
  • Notes 117
  • Bibliography 145
  • Index 157
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 166

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.