The United States and the Problem of Recovery after 1893

By Gerald T. White | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter I
1.
Stuart Daggett, Railroad Reorganization ( Boston, 1908), pp. 120-26.
2.
Railway Age and Northwestern Railroader, Feb. 24, 1893, p. 149. See also New York Herald, Feb. 21, 1893, p. 14; Public Opinion, Feb. 25, 1893, p. 504.
3.
An exhaustive monograph has been written about the National Cordage Company by Arthur S. Dewing, A History of the National Cordage Company ( Cambridge, Mass., 1913).
4.
Cordage Trade Journal, Feb. 15, 1893, p. 85.
5.
New York Herald, May 2, 1893, p. 12.
6.
The story was much more important to its day than the decline below $100 million on Apr. 22, 1893, of the U.S. Treasury gold reserve for the redemption of greenbacks. New York Herald, May 4, p. 7; May 5, p. 5; May 6, p. 5; Chicago Tribune, May 5, pp. 1, 4; New Orleans Picayune, May 5, p. 2; May 6, p. 2; San Francisco Examiner, May 5, p. 1; May 6, p. 1; etc.
7.
Chicago Tribune, May 8, pp. 1, 2; May 11, pp. 1, 2.
8.
New York Herald, May 27, p. 7.
9.
The best study of the banks and their relation to the crisis of 1893 is to be found in O. M. W. Sprague, History of Crises under the National Banking System ( Washington, D.C., 1910), pp. 166-210, 409-12.
10.
Commercial & Financial Chronicle, Jan. 6, 1894, p. 5.
11.
At the end of June 1894, 156 railroads operating 39,000 miles of track and capitalized at $2.5 billion--over 20 percent of the mileage and nearly 25 percent of the capitalization of all railroads in the United States--were in receivership. So precarious had been the earning power of these roads even during prosperity that only 18 had paid dividends on their common stock since 1880. Annual Report of the Interstate Commerce Commission, 1894 ( Washington, D.C., 1894), pp. 68-69.
12.
New York Herald, Aug. 18, p. 3; Aug. 19, p. 3; Chicago Tribune, Aug. 31, pp. 1, 2, 4, 5. Labor unrest tended to subside in September, when industrial conditions achieved greater stability with the end of the currency shortage.
13.
New York Herald, Aug. 17, p. 5; Aug. 26, p. 8. For an account of the

-117-

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The United States and the Problem of Recovery after 1893
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Chapter I- The Panic of 1893 1
  • Chapter II- A First Answer of Government 8
  • Chapter III- The Problem of Belief and the Unemployed 21
  • Chapter IV- The Tariff of 1894 33
  • Chapter V- The Bond Issues 41
  • Chapter VI- A Second Answer of Government 56
  • Chapter VII- Agriculture and Recovery 71
  • Chapter VIII- Exports of Manufactures and Recovery 82
  • Chapter IX- Recovery in 1898 91
  • Chapter X - An Overview and a "Legacy" 102
  • Notes 117
  • Bibliography 145
  • Index 157
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