Clarence King: A Biography

By Thurman Wilkins | Go to book overview

Six
END OF APPRENTICESHIP

King helped to nurse Hoffmann while Brewer made a trip to Yosemite Valley with Mr. Olmsted. Yosemite had become a famous place; nearly a thousand visitors had admired its wonders during the past ten years. The State Survey had backed a movement to make it "a public pleasure-ground"; and the Honorable John Conness had carried the gospel back to Washington. He had engineered a bill through Congress granting the valley and the Mariposa Grove of Big Trees to the State as a permanent park; a measure which President Lincoln had signed while King and his friends explored the High Sierra.

Now in September, 1864, Governor Frederick Low accepted the grant pending action by the State Legislature. Under the Governor's terms the valley and the grove were to be managed jointly by a commission including Whitney, Ashburner, and Galen Clark, with Olmsted serving as chairman. But, first of all, it was necessary to fix "the locus, extent, and limits" of the park; and the board chose King and Gardiner to conduct the survey. They were charged with running a boundary line, with gathering data for a map and studying the geology of the region.

King and Gardiner had taken Hoffmann to San Francisco, but they prepared in a week to return to the mountains. The survey would

-77-

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Clarence King: A Biography
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xiii
  • One - Enter Clarence King 1
  • Two - The Wind's Will 17
  • Three The Yale Years 31
  • Four Shasta, Here We Come 42
  • Five Rooftop Of the West 60
  • Six - End Of Apprenticeship 77
  • Seven - Along The Fortieth Parallel 93
  • Eight From Washoe To The Rockies 112
  • Nine - "Mountaineering. . ." 132
  • Eleven - The Pass Beyond Youtih 173
  • Twelve - "Systematic Geology" 194
  • Thirteen Cattle Baron 217
  • Fourteen - Merging The Surveys 230
  • Fifteen - Director Of Geology 244
  • Sixteen - Treasures Of The Sierra Madre 264
  • Seventeen - European Interlude 283
  • Eighteen - Silver Clouds And Darker Linings 299
  • Nineteen - Panic 323
  • Twenty - Ebb Tide 341
  • Selected Bibliography 357
  • Notes 379
  • Index 417
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