Star Papers; Or, Experiences of Art and Nature

By Henry Ward Beecher | Go to book overview

VIII. A RIDE.

COME, if you are a-going to-day, it's high time you were off. It's four miles to the mountain road, and then a stiff pull up the hills. Is the lunch in the basket? Have you got all your rig? Well, good morning all! And here we are under way. The sky is full of slowly-opening, rolling, evasive fleece-clouds, that never do what you think they are a-going to, and always develop with unexpected shapes and effects. So you get and lose the sunshine by turns, and go along a checkered road just under the Taconic range. First you have on your right the swampy meadows, full of rank grasses, clumps of alders. Here and there little arboral villages of hemlock, a fringe of bushes and trees wind circuitously through the four-mile stretch, having in charge a brook, whose fair face the sun is not to gaze at too broadly, but only in golden glances, softened and tempered to mildness by the leafy bath of lucid green through which it passes.

Birds are busy as you ride along, and they have an intuitive knowledge that you are not to disturb them. They scarcely rise from the bush. Blackwinged yellow-birds are harvesting the thistle-tops; king-birds, perched upon the corner stakes of the rail fence, wait till you are fairly up to them, and then with a fling and a measured circuit, they alight

-152-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Star Papers; Or, Experiences of Art and Nature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface. v
  • Contents 7
  • I- Ruins of Kenilworth. -- Warwick Castle. 9
  • II- A Sabbath at Stratford-On-Avon. 27
  • III- Oxford. 41
  • IV- The Louvre -- Luxembourg Gallery. 56
  • V- The Louvre. 70
  • VI- London National Gallery. 77
  • I- A Discourse of Flowers. 93
  • II- Death in the Country. 106
  • III- Inland Vs. Seashore. 110
  • IV- New England Graveyards. 121
  • V- Towns and Trees. 129
  • VI- The First Breath in the Country. 137
  • VII- Trouting. 144
  • VIII- A Ride. 152
  • IX- The Mountain Stream. 161
  • X- A Country Ride. 172
  • XI- Farewell to the Country. 182
  • XII- School Reminiscence. 189
  • Xiii. The Value of Birds. 194
  • Xiv. A Rough Picture from Life. 197
  • Xv. A Ride to Fort Hamilton. 201
  • Xvi. Sights from My Window. 211
  • Xvii. The Death of Our Almanac. 1853. 218
  • Xviii. Fog in the Harbor. 226
  • Xix. The Morals of Fishing. 231
  • Xx. The Wanderings of a Star. 240
  • Xxi. Book-Stores, Books. 250
  • Xxii. Gone to the Country. 256
  • Xxiii. Dream-Culture. 263
  • Xxiv. A Walk Among Trees. 271
  • Xxv. Building a House. 285
  • Xxvi. Christian Liberty in the Use of the Beautiful. 293
  • Xxvii. Nature a Minister of Happiness. 303
  • Xxviii. Springs and Solitudes. 314
  • Xxix. Mid-October Days. 324
  • Xxx. A Moist Letter. 336
  • Xxxi. Frost in the Window. 344
  • Xxxii. Snow-Storm Traveling. 348
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 359

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.