Star Papers; Or, Experiences of Art and Nature

By Henry Ward Beecher | Go to book overview

XVII. THE DEATH OF OUR ALMANAC. 1853.

He died without a groan. He seemed as vigorous, only the day before, as the first day of his life; and held his own to the last moment. Were it not that another child of the same family, bearing the same general features, and apparently of the same temper, is ready to take his place, we should be inconsolable. For, no other friend have we to whom we can go for advice, as we could to him. He was, doubtless, somewhat of an Oriental turn of mind, and spoke mostly in figures. Yet his knowledge in various things was not small and was exceedingly practical. He held converse with the stars, and seemed to know what was going on among all the planets. He had a habit of looking after the sun, and had become so well acquainted with his favorite resorts that he could tell you what he would do and where he could be found for years to come. He knew all the coquettings of the sun and moon; and all the seasons at which the stars would play bo-peep with each other; and all the caprices of the moon, from her slyest glance to the fullest gaze of her maidenly face.

Although his thoughts seemed much on high, he also had much earthly lore. He was particularly fond of looking after the tides; he kept a calendar of various

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Star Papers; Or, Experiences of Art and Nature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface. v
  • Contents 7
  • I- Ruins of Kenilworth. -- Warwick Castle. 9
  • II- A Sabbath at Stratford-On-Avon. 27
  • III- Oxford. 41
  • IV- The Louvre -- Luxembourg Gallery. 56
  • V- The Louvre. 70
  • VI- London National Gallery. 77
  • I- A Discourse of Flowers. 93
  • II- Death in the Country. 106
  • III- Inland Vs. Seashore. 110
  • IV- New England Graveyards. 121
  • V- Towns and Trees. 129
  • VI- The First Breath in the Country. 137
  • VII- Trouting. 144
  • VIII- A Ride. 152
  • IX- The Mountain Stream. 161
  • X- A Country Ride. 172
  • XI- Farewell to the Country. 182
  • XII- School Reminiscence. 189
  • Xiii. The Value of Birds. 194
  • Xiv. A Rough Picture from Life. 197
  • Xv. A Ride to Fort Hamilton. 201
  • Xvi. Sights from My Window. 211
  • Xvii. The Death of Our Almanac. 1853. 218
  • Xviii. Fog in the Harbor. 226
  • Xix. The Morals of Fishing. 231
  • Xx. The Wanderings of a Star. 240
  • Xxi. Book-Stores, Books. 250
  • Xxii. Gone to the Country. 256
  • Xxiii. Dream-Culture. 263
  • Xxiv. A Walk Among Trees. 271
  • Xxv. Building a House. 285
  • Xxvi. Christian Liberty in the Use of the Beautiful. 293
  • Xxvii. Nature a Minister of Happiness. 303
  • Xxviii. Springs and Solitudes. 314
  • Xxix. Mid-October Days. 324
  • Xxx. A Moist Letter. 336
  • Xxxi. Frost in the Window. 344
  • Xxxii. Snow-Storm Traveling. 348
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