The American Economy-Attitudes and Opinions

By A. Dudley Ward | Go to book overview

Preface

In logical order this is the fifth volume, but in order of publication it is the sixth volume, in the series of books on Ethics and Economic Life sponsored originally by the Federal Council of Churches, now part of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America.

This book is a report of a limited study of the attitudes and opinions of people in America about their economy. The purposes, scope, techniques, and results are discussed in the introduction and elaborated in the chapters which follow.

The psychological study of the effect of economic factors on mental and emotional health which was intended for inclusion in this volume does not appear in it because it seemed more appropriate to make that study available in another form. Plans have been initiated with that end in view.

The author acknowledges here his debt and appreciation to many persons who contributed knowledge, talent, and time to the process from which this book emerged.

In addition to Mr. Charles H. Seaver, whose invaluable help is acknowledged elsewhere, others who assisted materially in the study upon which the report is based are: Dr. Clyde Hart of the National Opinion Research Center; Dr. Josephine Williams, formerly with that organization; Professor Howard R. Bowen, former economic consultant, and Dr. F. Ernest Johnson, the present consultant for the series. The Reverend Cameron P. Hall, Executive Director of the Department of the Church and Economic Life, and Mr. Charles P. Taft, its Chairman, were available constantly for advice and support. Mrs. Barbara Solomon of the Study office served indispensably in many ways.

Gratitude is expressed to many others who participated generously and thoughtfully -- the leaders and recorders of the discussion groups, and those who carefully reviewed and criticized the manuscript in its several drafts.

None of these persons should be held responsible for the shortcomings which are all too apparent in the product of the venture.

A. DUDLEY WARD

Wilmette, Illinois March 1955

-xiii-

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The American Economy-Attitudes and Opinions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgment v
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xiii
  • Introduction xv
  • Part I - Work 1
  • 1 - Why People Work 5
  • 2 - Satisfaction and Dissatisfaction in Work 16
  • 3 - Labor Unions 30
  • 4 - The Use of Leisure 38
  • 5 - Retirement from Work 51
  • 6 - The Training of Youth 54
  • 7 - Security 66
  • 8 - Status 80
  • Part II - Moral Standards and Problems 91
  • 9 - A Complex of Standards 93
  • 10 - Honesty as a Standard 104
  • 11 - The Standard of Justice 126
  • 12 - Etkcs of Spending 133
  • 13 - Freedom 144
  • 14 - Influence of Religion and the Churches 154
  • 15 - Evaluation 163
  • Appendix 1 - The Interviewers' Questionnaire 173
  • Appendix 2 - The Discussion Groups 182
  • Index 197
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