The American Economy-Attitudes and Opinions

By A. Dudley Ward | Go to book overview

3
Labor Unions

The problems raised by the influence (on work) of the "organizational revolution" (as treated in an earlier volume of this series1) were not given prominence in either the individual interviews or the suggestions to the discussion groups. They were bound to emerge, of course, in both cases, since most if not all occupations have come under organizational influence. Government, national, state, and local, employs three to four million persons and regulates the employment of many others. In the professions, the clergy have to do with various forms and degrees of hierarchy; lawyers and physicians are subject to association rules; most teachers work in school systems under authority. Farmets have various cooperative organizations. In business and industry, corporations great and small are largely the employers of labor, while fifteen or more millions of their employed workers are members of labor unions.

Since the influence of labor unions was included in the individual interviews, and since it received considerable attention in some discussion groups, it seems worth while to gather up in a separate chapter what emerges on this topic from both types of inquiry.


1. THE INDIVIDUAL INTERVIEWS

In the individual interviews, it was found that about 48 per cent of the wage-and-salary workers belonged to a labor union. They were asked whether belonging to a union made (or would make) them feel any more or any less secure. About 46 per cent (40 union, 6 nonunion) replied "more secure"; 28 per cent (8 union, 20 nonunion), "no difference"; 10 per cent (1 union, 9 nonunion) "less secure." The others did not answer or the question did not apply to them. About 66 per cent of the union members said they thought the unions were "doing a good job on the whole."

____________________
1
Kenneth E. Boulding, The Organizational Revolution, New York, Harper & Brothers, 1953.

-30-

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The American Economy-Attitudes and Opinions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgment v
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xiii
  • Introduction xv
  • Part I - Work 1
  • 1 - Why People Work 5
  • 2 - Satisfaction and Dissatisfaction in Work 16
  • 3 - Labor Unions 30
  • 4 - The Use of Leisure 38
  • 5 - Retirement from Work 51
  • 6 - The Training of Youth 54
  • 7 - Security 66
  • 8 - Status 80
  • Part II - Moral Standards and Problems 91
  • 9 - A Complex of Standards 93
  • 10 - Honesty as a Standard 104
  • 11 - The Standard of Justice 126
  • 12 - Etkcs of Spending 133
  • 13 - Freedom 144
  • 14 - Influence of Religion and the Churches 154
  • 15 - Evaluation 163
  • Appendix 1 - The Interviewers' Questionnaire 173
  • Appendix 2 - The Discussion Groups 182
  • Index 197
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