Soviet Literary Characters: An Investigation into the Portrayal of Soviet Men in Russian Prose, 1917-1953

By Jeanne van der Eng-Liedmeier | Go to book overview

CONCLUSION

In each period we found among the uncomplicated characters two types which more and more become each others opposites: the 'perfect' and the 'seemingly perfect' Soviet man. Both devote themselves entirely to their social task, but on closer inspection the latter type appears to have impure motives. In the former type the gist of the portrayal is different in the various periods: sometimes the description of the personal experiences of the individual are neglected so as to give every attention to depicting the social revolution in which he plays a part: the civil war in the beginning of the twenties, the technical revolution at the beginning of the thirties. In such works the theme proper is an episode from the civil war or from the history of the first Five-Year Plan; the human being who appears in these works gives himself completely to his social task and does not seem to have any personal life. Apart from this resemblance there is a great difference between the 'revolutionary' against the background of the civil war and the 'hero of labour' against the background of the Five-Year Plan; in the former the tragedy of the struggle predominates, fought with varying success and always demanding victims, in the case of the latter a description is given of the construction of a project of the Five-Year Plan carried out according to a fixed scheme in a sphere of triumph and certainty; the 'hero of labour' therefore makes a less heroic impression than the hero from the civil war.

Besides these, however, there are many works in which the personal life of the Soviet man has in fact been woven into the story, but always in a more or less purified form, so that conflicts and even tensions between personal desires and social obligations are excluded. Such a character has overcome all 'baser' desires and is driven only by altruistic motives. He may be considered as the prototype of the New Man. Such characters are met with already in works of the first and second periods but not till the third period do they become much more frequent. We often find here a wise old man, matured by the ex-

-157-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Soviet Literary Characters: An Investigation into the Portrayal of Soviet Men in Russian Prose, 1917-1953
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Foreword 3
  • Contents 5
  • Introduction 7
  • I - Literary Types in the First Period (1917-1929) 11
  • II - Literary Types in the Second Period (1929-1934) 75
  • III - Literary Types in the Third Period (1934-1941) 107
  • IV - Literary Types in the Fourth Period (1946-1953) 129
  • Conclusion 157
  • Bibliography 169
  • Index of Authors 171
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 174

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.