The Autobiographical Novel of Co-Consciousness: Goncharov, Woolf, and Joyce

By Galya Diment | Go to book overview

2
"Heart" vs. "Mind" in A Common Story

The amount of autobiographical material that Goncharov intended to put into the novel was truly immense. There would be, in fact, very little in the finished work that did not come directly from the writer's life--a fact that he himself finally acknowledged in 1879, deciding that it was "Better Late Than Never" ( "Luchshe pozdno, chem nikogda," the actual title of his article) to set the record straight: "When I was writing Obyknovennaia istoriia, I naturally had in mind both myself and many others like myself who got educated at home or university, lived in quiet sleepy towns under the protective wings of kind mothers and later tore themselves away from the domestic bliss and comforts . . . to appear at the main arena of activity--Petersburg."1 While André Mazon's and Evgeny Liatsky's biographies of the writer are most helpful for anyone who is interested in the similarities between Goncharov's life and his novels, by simply reading whatever is available of Goncharov's letters, memoirs, and the reminiscences of his friends and relatives one can clearly establish most of the numerous parallels that exist between the writer's personal experiences and his first work.

There is only one aspect of Aleksandr Aduev's early life that is hard to verify as having come from the writer's own life--the protagonist's experience with women. Mazon sometimes speculates about the young writer's amorous connections but he has virtually no proof; and even Liatsky, who usually has a ready autobiographical parallel in Goncharov's life to almost every incident in Aleksandr Aduev's life, is quite at a loss here: "'Oh, there was a time when I, too, had a her,' wrote Goncharov, 'it was when I was young.' . . . Who that 'she' was for Aleksandr, we know-- Nadezhda Aleksandrovna Liubetskaia. Who was that 'she' for Goncharov?

-24-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Autobiographical Novel of Co-Consciousness: Goncharov, Woolf, and Joyce
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 204

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.