The Autobiographical Novel of Co-Consciousness: Goncharov, Woolf, and Joyce

By Galya Diment | Go to book overview

5
Woolf's Fictionalizing of Her Younger Self

We catch hardly a glimpse of Cam Ramsay in the first and longest section of the book, and the information we get about her is minimal. We know that she, like Virginia Stephen, was the second-youngest child in the family, and that a "tenpenny tea set made Cam happy for days" (go). We also learn that she is "wild and fierce" (36), "a wild villain," as Mr. Bankes, whose special favorite she is, lovingly calls her (83). Thus she is not unlike her creator who, according to Quentin Bell, "was felt to be incalculable, eccentric, and prone to accidents" as a child. 1 Like young Woolf, Cam is also a visionary, constantly driven by enigmatic forces not quite clear even to her mother: "She was off like a bird, bullet, or arrow, impelled by what desire, shot by whom, at what directed, who could say? What, what? Mrs Ramsay pondered, watching her. It might be a vision-- of a shell, of a wheelbarrow, of a fairy kingdom on the far side of the hedge; or it might be the glory of speed; no one knew" (84). Virginia Woolf described the same qualities of speed and vision in her younger self as "eagerness to grasp the whole universe" ( D, II, 23). But Cam's visions also keep her awake at night, and Mrs. Ramsay has to comfort her daughter by laying her head next to hers on the pillow and telling her about "flowers and bells and birds singing and little goats and antelopes" (172). Similarly, Julia Stephen used to make little Virginia go to sleep by telling her about "rainbows and bells" ( MB, 82). Her visionary nature makes Cam likely to become a writer, and so does her attention to detail: Mrs. Ramsay has to listen patiently to Cam's description of "an old woman with very red cheeks, drinking soup out of a basin" ( 84-85) before she gets the answer to her question of whether Paul and Minta have come back.

-82-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Autobiographical Novel of Co-Consciousness: Goncharov, Woolf, and Joyce
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 204

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.