The Autobiographical Novel of Co-Consciousness: Goncharov, Woolf, and Joyce

By Galya Diment | Go to book overview

9
Ulysses as an Alternative to the Autobiographical Bildungsroman

Ulysses, like To the Lighthouse, reminds one of a play--in this case, very appropriately, a Greek one. It has three parts and at least two classical unities: that of place ( Dublin) and of time (twenty-four hours). Like Woolf, Joyce believed in "moments of being" as the most meaningful measurement of time. "To him," Joyce wrote in 1912 about Blake, and, undoubtedly, about himself, "each moment shorter than a pulse-beat was equivalent in its duration to six thousand years, because in such an infinitely short instant the work of the poet is conceived and born" ( CW, 222). Joyce became the first English writer to compress the action of a novel to twenty-four hours, and upon hearing of similar attempts ( Woolf Mrs. Dalloway and Louis Bromfield Twenty-Four Hours, for example, appeared within five years of Ulysses) he used to remark: "The Prince of Wales seems to have passed through here," meaning that, like the Prince, he was a trendsetter. 1 He shared with Blake not only his sense of time but also his preoccupation with the themes of innocence and experience. In his autobiographical novel it was equally important for Joyce to record "an infinitely short instant" in the history of human lives and to reflect major stages of human development. In short, within the format of an un- or even anti-bildungsroman, Joyce wished to do what Bakhtin thought was possible only in traditional novels of education--to make "the hero himself . . . a variable."

One may actually argue that the dual protagonist of Joyce's non-bildungsroman, "Blephen-Stoom," becomes "a variable" to a much larger degree than Stephen Dedalus did alone in Joyce's earlier novel of education, for Ulysses replaces a few drastic developments within the one hero of Portrait

-139-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Autobiographical Novel of Co-Consciousness: Goncharov, Woolf, and Joyce
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 204

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.