England in the Eighteenth Century

By J. H. Plumb | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SEVEN
THE WAR AT SEA 1793-1802

PITT had become reconciled to a war with France only when France had violated the traditional commercial interests of England by opening the Scheldt and when, by her attack on Holland, we were committed by our Treaty obligations. His conception of the war was to check the increasing aggression of France. But this conception was too limited for George III, for Burke, and for an important section of the cabinet. They all wished to see not only France but the Revolution defeated, and the Bourbons restored. Subject as he was to royal, public and political pressure, Pitt compromised, and his compromise was fatal for military success. He agreed to give help to subversive movements in France, but insisted also on fighting a war on the traditional lines of his father. His military resources were inadequate for either policy, but Pitt was supremely confident that the war would be short. In 1793 he increased neither taxation nor his armed forces.

As the year drew on Pitt's confidence seemed fully justified. When war broke out the French were about to overwhelm a defenceless and complaining Holland, but, as soon as the veteran Austrian troops under Coburg moved against their flanks, the attack collapsed. Retreat and recrimination followed until in disgust Dumouriez, the most accomplished of French generals, deserted to the Allies, taking his guest, the French Foreign Secretary, with him. The road to Paris was wide open: a royalist insurrection in La Vendée and the defection of Toulon, France's great Mediterranean naval base, made Allied victory seem a matter of weeks. So

-195-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
England in the Eighteenth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 224

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.