The Lord Protector: Religion and Politics in the Life of Oliver Cromwell

By Robert S. Paul | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWO
EARLY POLITICAL EXPERIENCE

JOHN MORLEY once wrote that "the English have never been less insular in thought and interest than they were in the seventeenth century",1 and the reason is to be found in the continental roots of Puritanism and their own recent history. Englishmen remembered the threat of the Spanish Armada and the persecutions of Queen Mary's reign, they did not forget the recent Gunpowder Plot, and they were alarmed at the reported increase in the number of Popish recusants and the spread of Jesuit influence throughout their country; but all these facts were given added point when the Englishman looked across the Channel and saw the religious struggle being waged throughout the continent. In the struggle against Spain and the Empire, in the stubborn opposition of the Rochellais to Richelieu and in the victories of Gustavus Adolphus, the English Puritan felt that his own battles were being fought, and when Frederick, the Elector Palatine, was forced into exile, when La Rochelle was forced to capitulate, and when Wallenstein swept through central Europe, the Puritan felt that it was time for all true Englishmen to take a hand. "Puritans felt", wrote Sir Charles Firth, "that these German drums were a call to England to be up and doing. With anxious or exultant eyes, they followed each turn of fate in the death-struggle of Catholicism and Protestantism. . . . When Tilly fled before Gustavus at the Breitenfeld, Eliot cried that now 'Fortune and Hope were met'. When Gustavus fell at Lützen, every Puritan's heart sank within him."2 It was a cosmic struggle in which all the Powers of Light and Darkness were engaged, and this being so James I's vacillating foreign policy seemed to be criminal folly, Charles I's home policy appeared to be betrayal and the ecclesiastical measures sponsored by William Laud were seen not as a reasoned attempt to put the Anglican Church on a

____________________
1
Morley, Oliver Cromwell, 1899, 42.
2
Firth, Oliver Cromwell, 24 f.

-43-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Lord Protector: Religion and Politics in the Life of Oliver Cromwell
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 440

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.