Les Sauvages Américains: Representations of Native Americans in French and English Colonial Literature

By Gordon M. Sayre | Go to book overview

Notes

Preface
1.
Jantz, "Images of America in the German Renaissance,"97-100, suggests that the name caught on because of a series of coincidences or homophonic puns. The explorer's name resembled native place names along the coast of South America explored around 1500: "Among the dozens of variants that could be mentioned are such striking ones as Amaracao, Maraca, Marica, Maracaibo" (99). In addition, there is a pun on a Greek word meaning "'clear, pure, bright, dazzling land' or 'ever-young, ever-fair land'" (99). It is interesting that Olive Patricia Dickason adds an appendix to her book The Myth of the Savage discussing the possible native and European origins of the name Canada.
2.
Bacqueville de La Potherie, Histoire de l'Améique Septentrionale, 2:327- 28; English version, Blair, The Indian Tribes of the Upper Mississippi, 2:113.
3.
Nabokov and Snow, "Farmers of the Woodlands,"122.
4.
Richard White, The Middle Ground, 196.
5.
The influence of the Wild Man on the representation of the Savage has received a good deal of study. See Dickason, The Myth of the Savage; Bernheimer, Wild Men in the Middle Ages; and Dudley and Novak, The Wild Man Within.

Chapter One
1.
The "Indian Books" are at the J. P. Morgan Library in New York City. For more on these, and on Thoreau's possible plans to use the notes to write a book about Indians, see Sayre, Thoreau and the American Indians, 101-22. Some Thoreau notebooks have been published in facsimile reproductions as Canadian Notebooks and Thoreau's Fact Books, edited by Kenneth W. Cameron.
2.
Parkman, France and England in North America, 1:432.
3.
Parkman, Conspiracy of Pontiac, 347.
4.
Thoreau, A Yankee in Canada, 62.

-333-

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