Les Sauvages Américains: Representations of Native Americans in French and English Colonial Literature

By Gordon M. Sayre | Go to book overview

Works Cited
I have attempted to provide citations in the text with a minimum of clutter and apparatus by using page references in parentheses wherever possible. These page numbers refer to the editions listed below. Generally these references are easy to follow because there is only one title per author, or I have given the title in the text, or other clues make it clear which work is referred to. With several exceptions, quotations from translations are followed by their own page references, and both texts are listed below. The exceptions include the following:
Bossu: For the 1768 Nouveaux voyages aux Indes Occidentales, page numbers refer to Jacquin's 1980 French edition, entitled Nouveaux voyages en Louisiane, which should be more readily available than the original. Feiler's translation is of the 1769 edition, which differs only slightly from the volume of 1768. Quotations from Bossu's second book appear only in the epilogue.
Cartier and Champlain: I have avoided confusion between many different editions of these explorers' books by using H. P. Biggar's editions of the complete works of each. These feature same-page translations, so I have cited the page numbers only once.
Jesuit Relations: I have cited the Thwaites edition, which has become standard for both francophone and anglophone scholars. As this has facing-page translations, the page references appear only once. I have used the initials JR for these citations.
Lafitau: Because Fenton and Moore's translation includes bracketed page numbers to the original French edition of 1724, I have cited these, and only, once per quotation.
Lahontan: Réal Ouellet's ( Euvres complètes and Reuben Thwaites's first American edition include bracketed page numbers to the first French and English editions of 1703, and I have used these.
LeClercq: All page references are to his first work, Nouvelle relation de la Gaspesie, and its translation.

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